Retro Jimi Hendrix Poster Buddha Hippie 60′s

Jimi Hendrix


Jimi Hendrix Giant Poster
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Jimi Hendrix

The brilliance of Jimi Hendrix’s guitar would have set him apart even within the black music. Jimi Hendrix, who came to Britain in 1966 at the behest of Animal Chas Chandler and formed a trio, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, fusing blues, rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues, and the pyschedelic lyrics, drugs, and instrumental effects with which many British groups, among them Pink Floyd and the Beatles, had been experimenting. Hendrix also jammed with Cream and was an important influence on Clapton. Jimi Hendrix Experience Axis: Bold as Love Poster – Jimi Hendrix Buddha Poster – Giant Jimi Hendrix Posters – 60′s Retro Hippie Giant Poster

Retro 50′s American Advertisements Poster Collage

Retro Collage


Retro Collage American Advertisements Poster
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The Singing Butler Art Print

The Singing Butler Art Print

The Singing Butler Art Print
Jack Vettriano
20 in. x 16 in.

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Male White Lion with Blue Eyes Art Print

Full Frame Close Up Portrait of a Male White Lion with Blue Eyes. South Africa.

Male White Lion with Blue Eyes Art Print
Karine Aigner
24 in. x 18 in.

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Get Happy by Andy Warhol Pop Art Print

Get Happy by Andy Warhol Pop Art Print

Get Happy by Andy Warhol Pop Art Print
Billy Name
12 in. x 12 in.

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Giant Cup of Coffee Humor Art Prints

Woman Holding a Huge Cup of Coffee Art Print

Woman Holding a Huge Cup of Coffee Art Print
Pop Ink – CSA Images
12 in. x 12 in.

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Man Smelling Giant Cup of Coffee Art Print

Man Smelling Giant Cup of Coffee Art Print
Pop Ink – CSA Images
12 in. x 12 in.

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Vintage Dubonnet Wine Advertisement Art Print

Vintage Dubonnet Wine Advertisement Art Print

Vintage Dubonnet Wine Advertisement Art Print

8 in. x 10 in.

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Dubonnet Wine

Dubonnet is a sweet, wine-based aperitif. It is a blend of fortified wine, herbs, and spices (including a small amount of quinine), with fermentation being stopped by the addition of alcohol.

Dubonnet was first sold in 1846 by Joseph Dubonnet, in response to a competition run by the French Government to find a way of persuading French Foreign Legionnaires in North Africa to drink quinine.[1] Quinine combats malaria but is very bitter.

The brand-name Dubonnet was taken over by Pernod Ricard in 1976. It was re-popularised in late 1970s by an advertising campaign starring Pia Zadora. It is available in Rouge, Blanc and Gold (vanilla and orange) varieties. Dubonnet is also widely known by the advertisement slogan of the French graphic designer Cassandre “Dubo, Dubon, Dubonnet”, which still can be found on walls of houses in France. Dubonnet is commonly mixed with lemonade or bitter lemon, and forms part of many cocktails. Reputedly it is a favourite beverage of:

Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, who liked gin and Dubonnet: 30% gin, 70% Dubonnet with a slice of lemon under the ice. She once noted before a trip, “…I think that I will take two small bottles of Dubonnet and gin with me this morning, in case it is needed…”

Queen Elizabeth II, who also likes a Dubonnet and gin before lunch every day.

Hetty Wainthropp (self-made private investigator) of the BBC series Hetty Wainthropp Investigates.

Katie Morosky (played by Barbra Streisand) who drank “Dubonnet over ice” in the movie The Way We Were (1973).

In the movie Tootsie The main character as Dorothy Micheals orders a “Dubonnet with a twist” while dining at The Russian Tea Room.

Dubonnet has been said to be similar to Buckfast Tonic Wine.

Welcome to New York, Fashion City Travel Poster

Welcome to New York, Fashion City Travel Poster

Welcome to New York, Fashion City Travel Poster
Blonde Attitude
13 in. x 19 in.
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Lana Del Rey Music Poster

Lana Del Rey Music Poster

Lana Del Rey Music Poster

36 in. x 24 in.

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Lana Del Rey – Personal Life

Lana Del Rey stated that she has suffered from alcohol dependence. At the age of 15, she was sent to Kent School, a boarding school in Connecticut, for three years to get sober. In September 2012, she told GQ magazine:

I was a big drinker at the time. I would drink every day. I would drink alone. I thought the whole concept was so fucking cool. A great deal of what I wrote on Born To Die is about these wilderness years. When I write about the thing that I’ve lost I feel like I’m writing about alcohol because that was the first love of my life. My parents were worried, I was worried. I knew it was a problem when I liked it more than I liked doing anything else. I was like, ‘I’m fucked. I am totally fucked’. Like, at first it’s fine and you think you have a dark side – it’s exciting – and then you realise the dark side wins every time if you decide to indulge in it. It’s also a completely different way of living when you know that…a different species of person. It was the worst thing that ever happened to me.

Del Rey’s left hand is tattooed with the letter “M”, referencing her grandmother, Madeleine, and the word “paradise”. Her right hand is tattooed with the phrase “trust no one”. She also has the phrase “die young” tattooed on her right ring finger. She has been in a relationship with Kassidy ex-member Barrie-James O’Neill since August 2011. Del Rey has two apartments, one in New York City and one in Los Angeles, where she lives with her sister and brother. Del Rey is Roman Catholic. She is a supporter of the English Premier League team Liverpool and Scottish Premier League side Celtic.

Emily Dickinson Activist Poster Print

Emily Dickinson - Activist Poster Print

Emily Dickinson – Activist Poster Print

18 in. x 24 in.

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Emily Dickinson and Major Themes

Emily Dickinson left no formal statement of her aesthetic intentions and, because of the variety of her themes, her work does not fit conveniently into any one genre. She has been regarded, alongside Emerson (whose poems Dickinson admired), as a Transcendentalist. However, Farr disagrees with this analysis, saying that Dickinson’s “relentlessly measuring mind … deflates the airy elevation of the Transcendental”. Apart from the major themes discussed below, Dickinson’s poetry frequently uses humor, puns, irony and satire.

Flowers and Gardens

Farr notes that Dickinson’s “poems and letters almost wholly concern flowers” and that allusions to gardens often refer to an “imaginative realm … wherein flowers [are] often emblems for actions and emotions”. She associates some flowers, like gentians and anemones, with youth and humility; others with prudence and insight. Her poems were often sent to friends with accompanying letters and nosegays. Farr notes that one of Dickinson’s earlier poems, written about 1859, appears to “conflate her poetry itself with the posies”: “My nosegays are for Captives – / Dim – long expectant eyes – / Fingers denied the plucking, / Patient till Paradise – / To such, if they sh’d whisper / Of morning and the moor – / They bear no other errand, / And I, no other prayer”.

The Master Poems

Dickinson left a large number of poems addressed to “Signor”, “Sir” and “Master”, who is characterized as Dickinson’s “lover for all eternity”. These confessional poems are often “searing in their self-inquiry” and “harrowing to the reader” and typically take their metaphors from texts and paintings of Dickinson’s day. The Dickinson family themselves believed these poems were addressed to actual individuals but this view is frequently rejected by scholars. Farr, for example, contends that the Master is an unattainable composite figure, “human, with specific characteristics, but godlike” and speculates that Master may be a “kind of Christian muse”.

Morbidity

Dickinson’s poems reflect her “early and lifelong fascination” with illness, dying and death. Perhaps surprisingly for a New England spinster, her poems allude to death by many methods: “crucifixion, drowning, hanging, suffocation, freezing, premature burial, shooting, stabbing and guillotinage”. She reserved her sharpest insights into the “death blow aimed by God” and the “funeral in the brain”, often reinforced by images of thirst and starvation. Dickinson scholar Vivian Pollak considers these references an autobiographical reflection of Dickinson’s “thirsting-starving persona”, an outward expression of her needy self-image as small, thin and frail. Dickinson’s most psychologically complex poems explore the theme that the loss of hunger for life causes the death of self and place this at “the interface of murder and suicide”.

Gospel Poems

Throughout her life, Dickinson wrote poems reflecting a preoccupation with the teachings of Jesus Christ and, indeed, many are addressed to him. She stresses the Gospels’ contemporary pertinence and recreates them, often with “wit and American colloquial language”. Scholar Dorothy Oberhaus finds that the “salient feature uniting Christian poets … is their reverential attention to the life of Jesus Christ” and contends that Dickinson’s deep structures place her in the “poetic tradition of Christian devotion” alongside Hopkins, Eliot and Auden. In a Nativity poem, Dickinson combines lightness and wit to revisit an ancient theme: “The Savior must have been / A docile Gentleman – / To come so far so cold a Day / For little Fellowmen / The Road to Bethlehem / Since He and I were Boys / Was leveled, but for that twould be / A rugged billion Miles –”.

The Undiscovered Continent

Academic Suzanne Juhasz considers that Dickinson saw the mind and spirit as tangible visitable places and that for much of her life she lived within them. Often, this intensely private place is referred to as the “undiscovered continent” and the “landscape of the spirit” and embellished with nature imagery. At other times, the imagery is darker and forbidding—castles or prisons, complete with corridors and rooms—to create a dwelling place of “oneself” where one resides with one’s other selves. An example that brings together many of these ideas is: “Me from Myself – to banish – / Had I Art – / Impregnable my Fortress / Unto All Heart – / But since myself—assault Me – / How have I peace / Except by subjugating / Consciousness. / And since We’re mutual Monarch / How this be / Except by Abdication – / Me – of Me?”.