Month: June 2010

Happy 4th of July! Celebrate America’s Birthday

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Happy 4th of July! Celebrate America’s Birthday

Independence Day also known as 4th of July is the birthday of the United States of America. It is celebrated on July 4th each year in the United States. It is the anniversary of the day on which the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress – July 4, 1776. The day they announced to the world that the 13 colonies no longer belonged to Great Britain. Independence Day was first observed in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776.

On July 4, 1777, the night sky of Philadelphia lit up with the blaze of bonfires. Candles illuminated the windows of houses and public buildings. Church bells rang out load, and cannons were shot from ships breaking the silence. The city was celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the United States.

The Fourth of July soon became the main patriotic holiday of the entire country. Veterans of the Revolutionary War made a tradition of gathering on the Fourth to remember their victory. In towns and cities, the American flag flew; shops displayed red, white, and blue decorations; and people marched in parades that were followed by public readings of the Declaration of Independence. In 1941, Congress declared July 4 a federal legal holiday.

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White Lilac in Glass Vase by Edouard Manet

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White Lilac in Glass Vase by Edouard Manet

None of the colorists of Manet’s generation made men forget the colorist Delacroix; everything, or nearly everything, that tends to their glory increases his fame; he was their god. Delacroix’ color had come too early for the weakness of humanity. When the trappings of Romanticism were cleared away, his palette was thrown aside as one of its accessories. After the strong and healthy recognition of reality by the great landscape school of 1830 and the realism of the school of Courbet, painters were impelled to get at a right distance from Nature; this was the logical way between the two manifestations that had come to an end.

As soon as it was consciously recognised, the method of Daumier and of Delacroix was necessarily decisive. Why this way is modern, and why it achieves results which respond to vital and weighty needs, I hope at least to indicate in due course. The consciousness of this is a piece of modern culture. It is rooted in the postulate that Manet and his circle gave us not Nature, but the natural, and that all naturalisation of our instincts, i.e., all sharpening, purification, and amelioration, is modern.

Every joy is progress, and so therefore was Manet’s achievement. That achievement and its results had never occurred even to the magician Rubens, and, going through the whole history of art, we may find something similar, but never quite the same decisive consciousness. There are other values, the perfection of which put us to the blush, but in spite of this we would not exchange for them our own, the resplendent symbol of our best aspirations, our happiness, our epoch.

Manet discovered, to the horrified amazement of the world, that a fine feminine skin is neither yellow nor brown, but luminously white in the light, especially in juxtaposition to dark colours, and that blood pulses, that nerves and senses throb beneath it. Manet completed Courbet’s material, and refrained from any sort of formulation, in one sense or the other.

He made those elements of the material that seemed to him vital to his manner greater and firmer; not in order to subject it the more intelligibly to an idea, a theory, but rather to make it as vital as possible, capable of producing the effect of unity, and so of style; a strong, original organism, beautiful by that which makes it organic.

This is the ancient process common to all great–that is to say, to all instinctive–epochs, when artists were unconscious of any obligation to create for the pleasure of others. Manet discovered a new unity; no new law, as the aberrations of modern criticism would have us believe, but a new means of working out the old law.

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San Giorgio Maggiore by Twilight by Claude Monet

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San Giorgio Maggiore by Twilight by Claude Monet

There was a shorter, simpler, and much safer way, which the calm speculation of great savants had begun to mark out from the beginning of the nineteenth century, and which was ready by the time Monet’s successors set to work. In 1807 the Englishman Thomas Young formulated his theory of the three stimulants of the retina; in 1853 Dove’s study on colour was published; in 1864 Chevreul’s decisive work on colour-contrasts, in which the scientist for the first time demanded obedience from the artist. In the eighties important results followed quickly one on the other. In New York, O. N. Rood, in Germany, Helmholtz and many others, shed a flood of light upon the subject and found solutions for all the points with which science is competent to deal.

For the first time since the primitive periods, not only in France but anywhere, there was a program which brought the will of the individual into subjection to a perfectly organic doctrine. It was the purest abstraction, but in a different sense from that which had become usual. Whereas the painting of Monet abstracted from all the processes of the old masters on behalf of the personality of the author, personality tends to disappear here more and more in a method distinguished from the technical convention of the old masters by deeper research into the laws which the eye obeys. And this doctrine seemed to be not so much the result of research as the product of the art of immediate predecessors, in which the real stimulus to the development so far achieved was rightly recognised. Setting Turner aside, it was enough to point to Delacroix.

In his studies on Delacroix’ diary Signac has shown that Delacroix had recognised the principles of colour-division in Constable’s works, and had attempted to paint in accordance therewith himself. He points out how in the Louvre picture, Women of Algiers in an Interior, the strong colouristic effect is won by gradations and the use of complementary colours, and traces the artist’s progressive efforts in every new picture to clear his palette and to give greater animation to his surfaces by division of the brush stroke and of colour.

It was enough to develop this evident tendency and to sacrifice the rest. The sacrifice was made in respect of the differentiation or texture as taught by the old Dutch masters. Detail of texture, whether that of the skin or of clothing, was entirely subordinated. Even Monet neglected texture, in comparison with Manet, who treated the physiology of flesh, of flowers, and of stuffs all alike admirably. For Seurat there was but one unity of material: color.

If this is indeed the essential thing, the conclusion is irrefutable. But the point is obviously not whether this theorem is true or false, but how far it becomes a means in the hand of the artist for utilising all the capacities he can show. Signac rightly judges Delacroix to have been greatly superior to Monet, inasmuch as he produced greater effects by schematic contrasts and by the avoidance of arbitrary mixtures, although his palette was not composed exclusively of the pure colours used by the Impressionists.

Monet and Pissarro, revolutionaries far more arbitrary than the painter of Dante’s Boat, are often much dirtier in their general effects than Delacroix, and as this occurs in pictures which can only justify their existence by the utmost luminosity of tint, the difference appears a deficiency. Not merely a deficiency according to the doctrines of research, but above all a relative deficiency judged by the standard of the aspirations roused by these pictures. Gold must glitter like gold if we attempt to use it for demonstration.

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Digital Animal Paintings Artworks

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Digitally Edited Animal Art Paintings – Original Computer Artworks

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Olympic Games, Berlin, 1936 Giclee Print

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olympic games, berlin olympics, nazi germany, adolf hitler, sports art prints, traditional sports, mary evans collection, vintage art prints, olympic sports

Olympic Games, Berlin, 1936 Giclee Print

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Alice at the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party (Giclee Print)

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alice in wonderland vintage, alice at the mad hatters tea party, vintage art, mary evans collection, best sellers, tim burton, illustration, mad hatter, john tenniel, children’s stories, giclee prints, figurative art, decorative art posters, decorative art

Alice at the Mad Hatter's Tea Party Giclee Print

Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland (2010)

In the film, Alice is now nineteen years old and accidentally returns to Underland (misheard by Alice and believed to be called Wonderland), a place she visited thirteen years previously. She is told that she is the only one who can slay the Jabberwocky, a dragon-like creature controlled by the Red Queen who terrorizes Underland’s inhabitants. Burton said the original Wonderland story was always about a girl wandering around from one weird character to another and he never felt a connection emotionally, so he wanted to make it feel more like a story than a series of events. He does not see this as a sequel to previous films, nor as a re-imagining.

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Alice in Wonderland – Cheshire Cat Giclee Print

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vintage art, giclee prints, cheshire cat, mary evans collection, alice in wonderland vintage, illustration, domestic animals, children’s stories, english art, cats, john tenniel

Alice in Wonderland - Cheshire Cat Giclee Print

Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland (2010)

In the film, Alice is now nineteen years old and accidentally returns to Underland (misheard by Alice and believed to be called Wonderland), a place she visited thirteen years previously. She is told that she is the only one who can slay the Jabberwocky, a dragon-like creature controlled by the Red Queen who terrorizes Underland’s inhabitants. Burton said the original Wonderland story was always about a girl wandering around from one weird character to another and he never felt a connection emotionally, so he wanted to make it feel more like a story than a series of events. He does not see this as a sequel to previous films, nor as a re-imagining.

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Gee!! I Wish I were a Man, circa 1918 Giclee Print

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images from art collections, americana posters, giclee prints, american propaganda, vintage art, best sellers, christy howard chandler, war posters, library of congress, collections

Gee!! I Wish I were a Man, circa 1918 Giclee Print

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I Want You for the U.S. Army Giclee Print

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uncle sam wants you, i want you for the us army, giclee print, vintage art, Americana Posters, illustrated figures, american propaganda, american symbols, illustrators, united states culture, james montgomery flagg, library of congress, collections

I Want You for the U.S. Army Giclee Print

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Hearst Collection: Redbook August 1924, Giclee Print

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Redbook, August 1924 Giclee Print

Redbook MagazineRedbook Magazine

Redbook is an American feminist magazine published by the Society Hearst. It is one of the ‘ Seven Sisters, a group of feminist magazines of service.

Redbook’s articles are primarily targeted towards married women. The magazine features stories about women dealing with modern hardships, aspiring for intellectual growth, and encouraging other women to work together for humanitarian causes. The magazine profiles successful women, such as Christa Miller, to provide inspirational testimonies and advice on life.

best sellers, giclee prints, hearst collection, redbook, redbook magazine, sports art prints, vintage magazines, vintage posters, women posters, women’s fashion, publications

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