Month: July 2010

Dance of Joy by Monica Stewart

Share this artwork:

Dance of Joy by Monica Stewart

Monica Stewart was born in St. Louis Mo. At the age of five she moved with her family to Oakland, CA where she still resides. Her natural artistic ability was noticed early in life. She was encouraged by her parents and teachers to pursue a career in the field of art.

She attended the Academy of Art San Francisco CA, Cal State University Hayward CA and Chabot College Hayward, CA majoring in art.

Monica has become a nationally recognized artist. She enjoys working in various mediums and is well known for her fluid depiction of dancing figures painted on Egyptian palm frond paper.

Over the years She has participated in many solo and group exhibitions. Her work has been featured in movies and TV programs such as Waiting to Exhale, Romeo Must Die, and Living Single. Her images have been featured on the California State Lottery and Bank of America calendars. Monica’s images can be found in many galleries, shops, and stores across the nation and abroad in the form of original paintings, limited editions, prints, calendars, tapestries, puzzles, needlepoint kits, book covers and more.

Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Dance & Dancers: Tango by Willem Haenraets

Share this artwork:


Dance & Dancers: Tango by Willem Haenraets

dance and dancers, decorative art, Figurative Art, hispanic culture, hispanic dances, tango dancers, World Cultures

Tags : , , , , , ,

Dance & Dancers: Tango Argentino II Art Print

Share this artwork:

Dance & Dancers: Tango Argentino II Art Print

Tags : , , , ,

Dance & Dancers: Blue Tango by Michele Roohani

Share this artwork:


Blue Tango by Michele Roohani

Cafe Decoration, dance and dancers, decorative art, Female Artists, Figurative Art, michele roohani, tango dancers

Tags : , , , , , ,

Landscape Painting: Les Reflets by Camille Hilaire

Share this artwork:

Landscape Painting: Les Reflets by Camille Hilaire

Camille Hilaire (1916-2004)

Camille Hilaire was born in 1916 in Metz, France. He studied at L’Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris and participated in group shows in France and 18 other foreign countries since 1945. He had eight one-man shows in France and abroad since 1951 with regular exhibits at numerous French salons including: the Salon D’Automne, the Salon des Tuileries and the Salon des Independents.

The recipient of eight national and international awards including Le Prix de Venise, Le Chevalier des Arts et Lettres and Le Chevalier de l’Ordre du Merite Italien, Camille Hilaire’s works are valued additions in the collections of the French state and national governments, the Musee Djakarta in Indonesia and in Princeton University in the United States.

Camille Hilaire’s compositions manage to assert structure and achieve power by colour. He found a wonderful and constant sense of calm and scale, capturing light and the elements. Hilaire’s confident awareness of structure is manifest in his landscapes often characterised by their fresh and spicy green. Thus, nature and elements became a pretext on which the artist could “push” colour to generate the feel.

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Figurative Art: Apres la Danse by Jacques Lalande

Share this artwork:


Figurative Art: Apres la Danse by Jacques Lalande

apres la danse, art prints, ballet posters, collections, dance and dancers, Figurative Art, French Art

Tags : , , , , , ,

‘Conan’ painting by Frazetta goes for $1.5 million

Share this artwork:

Conan by Frank FrazettaThe price for “Conan the Destroyer” is the highest ever paid for artist Frank Frazetta’s work.

1971 painting fantasy artist Frank Frazetta has sold $ 1.5 million, two months after the death of the artist from Pennsylvania.

Frazetta managers said this week that a private collector bought “Conan the Destroyer” from a family trust. Managers and Stephen Robert Pistella Ferzoco call the highest price ever for a work of Frazetta.

The illustrator, died in Florida in May, to 82 years. His emblematic images of Conan the Barbarian, Tarzan and other characters often honored comic books, album covers and movie posters.

These last years, his children fought for an estate valued at tens of millions of dollars.

The feud boiled over in December when Frank Frazetta Jr. used a digger to try to break into a museum of the artist in the Pocono Mountains.

Tags : , ,

Music Festivals: Woodstock 1969

Share this artwork:

Music Festivals: Woodstock 1969

The 60’s, was (were) a turbulent decade. The assassination of JFK kept us on the television set for days and gave us the insecurity decades, others have not felt before.

Those of us growing into our own during the 60 have also been severely affected by the Vietnam War. We all watch the lotto “war” to see which of our friends and relatives would go around the world to fight in a country that we had not known existed.

I, like other people my age, number of the draft lottery was particularly painful as I had a brother who was barely 2 years older than me and I was not ready to let my friends and leave our safe, secure Long Island City.

The 60s also show the pains of growing racial issues that face all. Segregation, mixing, march on Washington and sit-ins in our schools. We all have to be equals.

Many families were separated by so-called generation gap. ” Parents not knowing what their kids did and the children learn not to trust anyone over 30.

There was confusion and mistrust between the “straight” and “heads”, the music was going in directions that most do not understand.

Tags : , , ,

The Aurut Bazaar or Slave Market at Istanbul

Share this artwork:

The Aurut Bazaar or Slave Market

The Arab slave trade refers to the practice of slavery in West Asia, North Africa, East Africa, and certain parts of Europe (such as Sicily and Iberia) during their period of domination by Arab leaders. The trade mostly involved North and East Africans and Middle Eastern peoples (Arabs, Berbers, Persians, etc.). Also, the Arab slave trade was not limited to people of certain color, ethnicity, or religion.

In the early days of the Islamic state—during the 8th and 9th centuries—most of the slaves were Slavic Eastern Europeans (called Saqaliba), people from surrounding Mediterranean areas, Persians, Turks, other neighbouring Middle Eastern peoples, peoples from the Caucasus Mountain regions (such as Georgia and Armenia) and parts of Central Asia (including Mamluks), Berbers, and various other peoples of varied origins as well as those of Black African origins. Later, toward the 18th and 19th centuries, slaves increasingly came from East Africa.

Tags : , , , , , ,

French scientists crack secrets of Mona Lisa

Share this artwork:

French scientists crack secrets of Mona LisaThe enigmatic smile remains a mystery, but French scientists say they have cracked a few secrets of Lisa “Mona”. French researchers studied seven Louvre Museum Leonardo da Vinci paintings, including Lisa “Mona” to analyze the use of control successive ultra-thin layers of paint and varnish – a technique that gave his works their quality of dream.

The specialists of the Centre for Research and Restoration of Museums of France noted that da Vinci painted up to 30 layers of paint on its work to meet its standards of subtlety. Added up, all the layers are less than 40 micrometers, or about half the thickness of a human hair, the researcher Philip Walter, said Friday.

The technique, called “sfumato”, has given da Vinci and the blurred outlines of a quality and create an illusion of depth and shadow. His use of the technique is well known, but a scientific study on this subject has been limited because the tests often required samples of the paint.

French researchers have used a noninvasive technique called X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to study the layers of paint and chemical composition.

They brought their tool specially developed high-tech in the museum where it was closed and studied the portraits of faces, which are emblematic of sfumato. The project was developed in collaboration with the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble.

The tool is so precise that “now we can discover the mixture of pigments used by the artist for each coat of paint,” said Walter The Associated Press. “And it’s very, very important for the understanding of technology.”

The analysis also shows pictures of different da Vinci is constantly striving for new methods, Walter said. In the Lisa “Mona” Da Vinci manganese oxide in its nuances. In others, he used copper. Often, they use glazes, but not always.

Tags : , , , , ,