Category: Abstract Art

The Mystical Quality in Abstract Art

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The Mystical Quality in Abstract Art

Under this quality of visual excitement, support and renew it often runs a strong current of feeling close to religion. It may take the form of an ever new wonder-“The mystical quality of the object has always kept me spellbound,” Lyonel Feininger wrote. It may be admitted pantheism of Lee Gatch. It may be the mystical identification Ibram Lassaw self with the whole order of things: “Man is an integral part of the overall ecology of the universe and fulfills its function… with plants, animals, stars and galaxies I nature… ”

This widespread feeling that nature is a more convenient storage of forms, colors or symbols, it has ultimate significance in itself than the visible, but always mysterious manifestation of an eternal order, is reflected in the attitude of these artists for their art. Painting and sculpture, for them, are means to an end – the end being the exploration and revelation of the ultimate meaning that the limits that can be penetrated by reason and intuition.

Such an attitude is in direct opposition to the very exaltation of “the primacy of the environment”, which combines the spokesperson Sonya Rudikoff with abstract expressionism and even with the vanguard of all ages. While the relationship of the abstract expressionists in nature will be discussed later, it is interesting that an artist, Perle Fine, who was closely associated with them, writes: “When I got my studio in the country, and the wonder and grandeur of the natural world captivated me completely, I felt I must find new ways to express these things, “and his recent use of gold and silver in his paintings , was in response to this experience, rather than purely technical claims.

Finally, one can perhaps say that the work of those artists who are consciously and consist mainly with nature tends to be more objective than subjective, although these terms are slippery. In a sense, all art is subjective. Even the search for the essence is deeply involved in the response of the artist about it, “he is interested in what he” feels “about it and painted, therefore, that the result is often called abstract” , said Mark Tobey. At times, the answer seems much more important than what he does, and almost nothing to do with any inherent quality at its source.

When Louise Bourgeois created the garden at night, she was not at all concerned with gardens, but seeks to objectify experience recurrent mixed attraction and fear inspired by the dark mysterious hidden under the plants, even under a clear night sky. Nevertheless, the majority of this group of abstract artists to maintain a certain balance between the inherent nature of things and their own reactions to them.

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Our Abstract Art exclusive website is launched

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Our Abstract Art exculive website is launched

For the past hundred years, abstract art has been a dominant mode of expression in America. But in its character, most of our abstract painting and sculpture pays small fealty to the concepts of those pure abstractionists, who hold that the work of art should be a completely meaningful object in itself, of solely esthetic significance, hermetically sealed against all other associations.

In Europe, as George Hamilton pointed out in the catalogue of his “Object and Image” exhibition at Yale, this atlitude is historically associated with the early modern movemen in its heroic break with tradition and is diametrically opposed to a more recent trend toward an abstract but evocative imagery which reflects man’s consciousness and inner being. In America,

ew even of our pioneer abstractionists could be called purists. The latter began to appear here only in the 1930’s (many from abroad), and while they still form an active and vital group, they have always been a minority. Our tendency, more marked than ever today, has been toward kinds of abstraction which draw on observed reality to create, variously, a conscious imagery, an unconscious imagery or, at the least, a kind of organic and “natural” teleology of form.

It is our purpose here to determine exactly what the relation is between American abstract, art and one traditionally important aspect of observed reality — nature. The inquiry is not in any sense a reactionary back-to-nature thesis. It is, rather, an effort to understand the character of the abstract vision and especially the personal attitudes and methods of various abstract artists in dealing with nature.

Our Abstract Art exculive website is launched

These terms are used in their widest and commonest meanings: “abstraction” to describe any art not clearly based on recognizable visual reality, “nature” as the all-embracing universe about us, the tangible world of land and water, the intangible world of light, sky and air, the eternal forces of germination, growth and death which make up the cycles of life and season — with man and man-made things alone excluded.

It is apparent that this is but part of a larger question, the relation of’ abstract art to all experience. Still, it is a significant part, for the multitudinous aspects of nature are inescapable, a part of every man’s environment. Since the Renaissance they have been the timeless themes of art, and there is ample evidence that they continue to move, and sometimes perplex, many abstract artists just as powerfully.

By focusing on this single but universal area of experience and avoiding the moral and social problems inherent in man and his works, we can perhaps dig deeper and hope to reveal certain truths about the abstract artist’s approach to reality, which will be valid in other areas as well.

Such a restriction does not imply dehumanization, for the artist has always found in nature compelling symbols of man’s own “nature,” especially of his relation to the organic world. And even when symbolism is absent, nature inevitably assumes human meaning as it passes through the artist’s eye, mind and emotions to his canvas. In Balcomb Greene’s words, “One humanizes nature even as he sees it.”

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Joan Miró and Abstract Artworks

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Joan Miró and Abstract Artworks

Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20,1893 – December 25,1983) was a world renowned Spanish Catalan painter, sculptor, and ceramist who was born in the sea port city of Barcelona.

Miro was the son of a watchmaking father and a goldsmith mother, he was exposed to the arts from a very young age. There have been some drwaings recovered by Miro dating to 1901, when he was only 8 years old. Miro enrolled at the School of Industrial and Fine Arts in Barcelona until 1910; during his attendance he was taught by Modest Urgell and Josep Pascó.

After overcoming a serious bout of typhoid fever in 1911, Miro decided to devote his life entirely to painting by attending the school of art taught by Francesc Galí. He studied at La Lonja School of Fine Arts in Barcelona, and in 1918 set up his first individual exhibition in the Dalmau Galleries, in the same city. His works before 1920 (the date of his first trip to Paris) reflect the influence of different trends, like the pure and brilliant colors used in Fauvism, shapes taken from cubism, influences from folkloric Catalan art and Roman frescos from the churches.

His trip to Paris introduced him to and developed his trend of surrealist painting. In 1921, he showed his first individual exhibition in Paris, at La Licorne Gallery. In 1928, he exhibited with a group of surrealists in the Pierre Gallery, also in Paris, although Miró was always to maintain his independent qualities with respect to groups and ideologies.

From 1929-1930, Miró began to take interest in the object as such, in the form of collages. This was a practice which was to lead to his making of surrealist sculptures. His tormented monsters appeared during this decade, which gave way to the consolidation of his plastic vocabulary. He also experimented with many other artistic forms, such as engraving, lithography, water colors, pastels, and painting over copper. What is particularly highlighted from this period, are the two ceramic murals which he made for the UNESCO building in Paris (The Wall of the Moon and the Wall of the Sun, 1957-59).

It was at the end of the 60´s when his final period was marked and which lasted until his death. During this time, he concentrated more and more on monumental and public works. He was characterized by the body language and freshness with which he carried out his canvasses, as well as the special attention he paid to material and the stamp he received from informalism. He concentrated his interest on the symbol, not giving too much importance to the representing theme, but to the way the symbol emerged as the piece of work.

In 1976 the Joan Miró Foundation Centre of Contemporary Art Study was officially opened in the city of Barcelona and in 1979, four years before his death, he was named Doctor Honoris Causa by the University of Barcelona.

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Endless Love and Figurative Abstract

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Endless Love and Figurative Abstract

Alfred Gockel, Alexander (he goes by Alex, but his name is “Alfred”) was born in the coal mining town Lüdinghausen, Germany in 1952. Gockel’s first work was published when he was only eight years. He wanted to become an engineer, but at the age of 16 Gockel started working in the coal mines in Germany. When the mining industry has slowed, many locals found themselves unemployed.

The struggle Gockel felt at that time continues to do his work of art today. “I like to touch the soul of the viewer with my colors,” says Gockel. “Often in my paintings I use elements that reflect my difficult past, when a boy, I worked in coal mines. But my goal is to express my joy of life, and show that we can overcome many obstacles through the expressions of the beauties of life. ”

After more than two years in the army, Gockel refocused its attention on the arts and in 1973 he enrolled at the Polytechnic Academy in Munster, Germany. Gockel studied art and design and learned the techniques of lithography and serigraphy. After graduation, Gockel teaches graphic design and typography at the Academy. In the early 1980s Gockel has decided to concentrate on his art full time. In 1983 he and his wife Ingrid founded an art publishing company, Art Before, a player currently ranked in the abstract segment of the market, with customers in over 50 countries worldwide.

From its humble beginnings, Gockel has become one of the most prolific distributors of posters of modern art in the world. According to some estimates, sales in more than 10 million worldwide, they can be seen in design studios and private and large companies in the world. Gockel, was commissioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee to create an official piece of artwork for the 2006 Olympics in Turin, Italy.

Gockel’s unique style – boldly colored abstract images doubled in thick black on a white canvas – has become his signature. “The art in both culture and the influences he imitates,” Gockel said. “I’m influenced by colors, symbols, textures, fibers and models used by different cultures around the world. ”

Still active in his “spare time” Gockel plays tennis, walks in the German forests with his two dogs, or riding Harley Davidson with his wife. They enjoy spending time at their favorite spot on the island of Sylt.

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Abstract Art: An Universal Language

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Abstract Art: An Universal Language

Those who have followed the course of abstract art over the past 70 or 80 years will have been struck by its persistence. When the Cercle et Carré exhibition was held in April 1930, the Parisian press informed us that such painting was “the mere ghost of an experiment which we thought had died long ago,” and that “all this has nothing new to offer.” In 1955 the same outbursts of weariness and boredom, if not anger, can be heard at any exhibition of abstract art: “about time the joke was buried… same old bag of tricks… poor old public.”

Maybe. But things become entirely different if we are patient enough to take a closer look. Then we see that abstract art has never stopped adding to its range and means of expression, never faltered in its search for greater depth. If the ABC of this language was firmly established in the ‘heroic’ phase by Kandinsky, Mondrian, Delaunay and Malevitch, this does not mean that everything has been said in the same language.

The critics’ ignorance and the public’s sophisticated grumbling were unable to prevent it from branching out into the remotest corners of the western world, where it has won over intelligent collectors and gained a hold, even a considerable hold, in civic museums and galleries. Kandinsky and Mondrian, both of whom lived to a good age, thanks to their long working life were able to show their successors what a range of values can be drawn out of such simple elements; Kandinsky stressing inventiveness and Mondrian the importance of increasing depth.

The other movements or schools which sprang up in such great numbers all over the world in the past hundred years all enjoyed a much shorter span of life. At the moment of writing (1955), abstract painting has flourished for forty years and shows no signs of slackening vitality.

Those critics who began by encouraging it but who now pull a long face at some geometrical composition by Vasarely or some colour-composition by Riopelle, remind me of Zola when, throwing over his former Impressionist friends in 1896, he voiced his disillusionment in a notorious article in the Figaro which does not stand to his credit: “Not a single artist in this group,” wrote the author of L’Œuvre, “has succeeded in translating into paint, with the slightest power of finality, the new formula which is to be observed in snippets on their various canvases… They are all forerunners. The genius is yet to be born… They are all unequal to the task they have set themselves, they can’t talk, they stutter.” At the Jeu de Paume Museum (for example) we can now go and see exactly what stuttering meant. No oracle is needed to predict that fifty years hence some other Jeu de Paume will be showing an astonished public those masterpieces of abstract art that are being painted at the present time and which we are treating with contempt.

Written by: Ilyas Hizli

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Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

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Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

Spontaneity. With no pretense, or explanation, Ruth Palmer paints contemporary abstracts by feeling her way through the process and connecting to the soul of the subject, without concern for distinctions between representation and abstraction.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Palmer now resides in Calgary, Canada. While her primary influence is spiritual, based in Christianity; her art is also influenced by the richness of Manet’s impressionist works and what she deems the “colorful play and balance” of Kandinsky’s. Like Kandinsky, for whom spiritual influences counted heavily, there’s a certain intentional separation with Palmer’s art that allows viewers to participate in creating the artwork. The disunion is repaired when the painted form connects to the viewer’s soul.

Ruth’s works are extremely popular in print, particularly in the design market and hospitality industry. Her paintings and digital renderings can be enjoyed in many hotels and corporate offices worldwide. Recently Ruth was asked to create a collection for installation on one of Pullmantur’s new cruise ships and one of her best-selling pieces “Luscious Red” can be found in the new release of “The Spirituality Of Sex” by Wood Lake Publishing – a Canadian Christian Publisher.

Original paintings are currently in private collections throughout Canada, the United States, Australia, England and Scandinavia.

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Cubism: An intellectual revolt against the artistic expression of previous eras

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Cubism: An intellectual revolt against the artistic expression of previous eras

Cubist Theory

Cubism began as an intellectual revolt against the artistic expression of previous eras. Among the specific elements abandoned by the cubists were the sensual appeal of paint texture and color, subject matter with emotional charge or mood, the play of light on form, movement, atmosphere, and the illusionism that proceeded from scientifically based perspective. To replace these they employed an analytic system in which the three-dimensional subject (usually still life) was fragmented and redefined within a shallow plane or within several interlocking and often transparent planes.

Analytic and Synthetic Cubism

In the analytic phase (1907–12) the cubist palette was severely limited, largely to black, browns, grays, and off-whites. In addition, forms were rigidly geometric and compositions subtle and intricate. Cubist abstraction as represented by the analytic works of Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, and Juan Gris intended an appeal to the intellect. The cubists sought to show everyday objects as the mind, not the eye, perceives them—from all sides at once. The trompe l’oeil element of collage was also sometimes used.

During the later, synthetic phase of cubism (1913 through the 1920s), paintings were composed of fewer and simpler forms based to a lesser extent on natural objects. Brighter colors were employed to a generally more decorative effect, and many artists continued to use collage in their compositions. The works of Picasso, Braque, and Gris are also representative of this phase.

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Abstract Art: Veering away from traditional concepts

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Abstract Art: Veering away from traditional concepts

Modern Art – art created from the 19th century. mid-20th cent. by artists who veered away from traditional concepts and techniques of painting, sculpture and other fine arts that has been practiced since the Renaissance (see Renaissance art and architecture). Almost all phases of modern art was initially received by the public ridicule, but as the shock wore off, the various movements settled into history, influencing and inspiring new generations of artists.

Related Links: Wassily Kandinsky Art Site
All About Abstract Art

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Gabriella Benevolenza and Abstract Expressionism

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Gabriella Benevolenza - Horizon Bleue Art Print

Gabriella Benevolenza, a young woman of Italian-Finnish descent was born in Helsinki, Finland in July, 1968. She was raised in various countries finally settling in Alsace (France), where she lives and paints. She studied “Arts plastique” from 1992 – 1995. She is now a valued member of AIDA (Artistes Independent d’Alsace).

Always very “constructed”, her semi-abstract work is a search for transparancy and colour balance: light and the variations of adding different types of material. She uses plaster of paris, metal pigmented paints, various types of cloth, emery paper or printed collage material.

Gabriella Benevolenza

Gabriella Benevolenza always uses collages and sometimes a square stencil. She gives rythme to her paintings by using horinzontal and/or vertical lines. On a symbolised landscape, a horizontal division may suggest houses, a small harbor, bottles or a simple forms and colors harmony, that no title helps the viewer with orientation.

The artist, herself, often remarks that: “ I may not see anything”

The most important is not the title, but the harmony of the complete color palette : from warm colours to bright orange, smooth and delicate greys, astonishing beiges that illuminate a wide space. A red point may bring , in true freedom, the final touch.

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Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

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Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

Spontaneity. With no pretense, or explanation, Ruth Palmer paints contemporary abstracts by feeling her way through the process and connecting to the soul of the subject, without concern for distinctions between representation and abstraction.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Palmer now resides in Calgary, Canada. While her primary influence is spiritual, based in Christianity; her art is also influenced by the richness of Manet’s impressionist works and what she deems the “colorful play and balance” of Kandinsky’s. Like Kandinsky, for whom spiritual influences counted heavily, there’s a certain intentional separation with Palmer’s art that allows viewers to participate in creating the artwork. The disunion is repaired when the painted form connects to the viewer’s soul.

Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

Ruth’s works are extremely popular in print, particularly in the design market and hospitality industry. Her paintings and digital renderings can be enjoyed in many hotels and corporate offices worldwide. Recently Ruth was asked to create a collection for installation on one of Pullmantur’s new cruise ships and one of her best-selling pieces “Luscious Red” can be found in the new release of “The Spirituality Of Sex” by Wood Lake Publishing – a Canadian Christian Publisher.

Original paintings are currently in private collections throughout Canada, the United States, Australia, England and Scandinavia.

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