Category: Floral and Botanical Art

Vivian Flasch: Reproducing the beauty of nature on canvas

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Vivian Flasch: Reproducing the beauty of nature on canvas

Vivian Flasch truly has a love for painting and it shows! She is a much-published artist whose work is highly in demand worldwide. Vivian paints full time in her studio located in the lush green hills of Kentucky. She has always loved working in her flower garden and being surrounded by nature. She finds a special joy in reproducing the beauty of nature on canvas.

Vivian Flasch began painting as a hobby when her children were young and it has bloomed into a fulfilling career that has become more successful than she had ever dreamed. She paints in both oil and acrylic on canvas. She equally enjoys painting flowers, still life, landscapes, portraits and murals.

Vivian Flasch: Reproducing the beauty of nature on canvas

Her style varies from contemporary to traditional realism. Her work has been reproduced as prints, on hatboxes, night-lights, tapestries, note cards, needlework, puzzles, journals, albums and more. Her open edition prints are reproduced by Galaxy of Graphics and sold worldwide. She says it is truly a blessing to be successful doing something that she loves so much! Vivian paints from her heart to yours, and tucks a heart into each painting for you to find.

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Aqua Burn Abstract Landscape Postcard

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Aqua Burn Postcard
Aqua Burn Postcard by MADART_GALLERY
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aqua burn art print, aqua burn abstract poster, aqua burn abstract art print, abstract artworks, megan aroon duncanson artworks, multicolored abstract, abstract landscape

Abstract Tree Canvas Painting Art Print
Abstract Tree Canvas Painting Art Print by made_in_atlantis
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Modern Abstract Painting Art Print
Modern Abstract Painting Art Print by made_in_atlantis
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Expressing Van Gogh in Terms of Art

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Van Gogh's Starry Blue Night Over Rhone Painting Poster
Van Gogh's Starry Blue Night Over Rhone Painting Poster by hizli_art
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It is difficult to express Van Gogh in terms of art. It is always absolutely vital, because it is power; and power is always beauty. His harmonies are of a physical order, and therefore outside the melancholy or the delight to which the mind is stirred by other sorrowful or cheerful pictures. The reaction induced by his works is at first a purely physical one.

The planes of his canvases, which seem to have been pro­duced, not by brushes, but by the stonemason’s implements, scream, and we are sometimes tempted to scream in unison, just as we feel inclined during a storm to shout aloud with the thunder. It is the cry of the human animal, whose blood is quickened by the enigmatic relation of the individual to the cosmos, who yearns to penetrate into his environment, into Nature, and destroys either this or himself if he does not succeed.

Van Gogh did not produce his art; it was as much a part of himself as is some material function a part of the body; it was not something external to him, but his closest idiosyncrasy, joy or suffering. To this man, who first turned to art in his later years, and then perhaps only as to a pisaller, it was apparently a thing inherent, with which perforce he had to live and die.

That this pathological phenomenon should have resulted in aesthetic achieve­ment is no more remarkable than that Nature, of whatever kind it may be, produces beauty. Van Gogh regarded a striving after perfection as a natural morality. He was a cleanly animal. He owed more to Daumier and to Delacroix than to all the Impressionists. Here the peasant, who regretted that Paris did not possess more “tableaux en sabots,” found a kindred spirit.

When he took the group of the three topers with the child at the table, from Daumier Buveurs,† he did Daumier the highest honour in his power and–like Delacroix, when he used Raphael’s composition in the Vatican for his Heliodorus in St. Sulpice–added to his own laurels by producing one of his most individual pictures. He found in Daumier the justification of his own linear exaggerations, the flaming play of his aspiring lines, that seem to crouch in order to strike more surely.

He had also a great admira­tion for Cézanne, and an unbounded veneration for Monticelli, to whom he was drawn more closely by that magic South where Cézanne painted his fruits and the old gipsy his marvellous colour fantasies. In a letter to Aurier, containing perhaps the most complete revelation of an artist’s psychology ever penned–it appears in Aurier Œuvres Posthumes–he almost indignantly assigns the praise awarded to himself to Monticelli, even ranking Jeannin’s and the aged Guost’s flower-pieces above his own works.

He esteemed Meissonier, because Mauve thought highly of him, and venerated Ziem, because Ziem venerated Delacroix. This naivete does not, however, preclude very delicate appreciations. He speaks of a Monticelli at Lille, “autrement riche et certes non moins français que le Départ pour Cythère de Watteau,” and opines that no other artist has approved himself so directly the heir of Delacroix, though Monticelli received Delacroix’ teaching at secondhand, through Diaz and Ziem…

These few lines also contain all the physiology of Monticelli that was valuable to Van Gogh. He made his start under the spell of the Impressionists. Pissarro had the same influence upon him as upon Gauguin and later upon Bernard. His Quatorze Juillet à Asnières, one of the very best of his pre-Arlesian pictures, is painted very thinly, the colour divided into minute green and yellow particles on a gray ground.

At Arles he came to think this technique insufficient. He was temperamentally incapable of consistent work on this system, by which Signac fixed the vapourous quality of Southern landscape; and further, he had not time for it. The exact opposite attracted him in Monticelli: the heavy fabric of loaded colour, with which the old magician produced his thousand accidents. Van Gogh exaggerated this, but at the same time, he simplified it, he rejected what was petty and incidental, reduced the palette to single pure colours, laid on in large, coarse fragments, and added his own temperament as the amalgam.

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Natasha Wescoat and Jeweled Trees

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Unfurling Wonderland by Natasha Wescoat

A self-taught artist from Michigan, Natasha comes from a family of artists, including the famous painter, Georgia O’Keefe. She began drawing at an early age when her interest in geeks and crime fighting birthed her obsession for superhero comic books. First copying the art of others, and then creating her own characters, Natasha’s childhood love for the fantastical world fueled her passion for pop art.

As a teenager, she became inspired by Gustav Klimt, Takashi Murakami, and Tim Burton and planned for a career as an artist and animator for Disney. Natasha began studying graphic design and fine art at Delta College before a series of successful eBay auctions in 2004 launched her commercial career. Since those very first online sales, she now has more than 1,000 original pieces in private and corporate collections around the world. She is perhaps best known for her whimsical landscapes and the popular, award-winning series, “Jeweled Trees,” the series that propelled her into a professional career.

Today, her colorful and playful style has helped her to create uniquely identifiable imagery that extends beyond her trademarked “Jeweled Trees” to other colorful landscapes, whimsical creatures, and young women in fantasy themes. She has an exceptional eye for design and emerging trends and uses her skills to develop colorful artwork that appeals to everyone, whether in the home, in the office, or on products.

Natasha Wescoat Biography

Prolific and hardworking, Natasha is a highly-skilled self-promoter. Her talent, determination, and love of technology have helped her create a diverse and obsessive fan base truly unique to any young artist. She excels in connecting with her fans, collectors, and clients to keep them coming back for more.

She is a juried member of EBSQ and Self Representing Artists. Her work has been featured in many publications, including the 2008 Artists and Graphic Designers Market Book, the New York Time’s Bestseller and Wall Street Journal Bestseller ”Crush It” by Gary Vaynerchuk, and “Fans, Friends and Followers” by Scott Kirsner. The A&E Channel, NBC News, ABC’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition, Lifetime Channel, the Ritz-Carlton gallery in Los Angeles, Leo Laporte’s TWiT, and Ford have shown Natasha’s work. She is also an Abrakadoodle Artist of Distinction.

Natasha was one of Ford Motor Company’s first 100 agents in the “Fiesta Movement.” She spent more than six months behind the wheel of her own Fiesta, live streaming her experience to help launch the Fiesta brand.

In addition to her painting and the development of a new children’s book, Natasha writes regularly at her official blog, Fresh Gloss, and frequently speaks at seminars and conferences about art, social media, self-promotion, and motivational topics. She serves as Chief Creative Officer of Natasha Wescoat Enterprises, LLC, a firm she co-founded in 2011 to promote her art and work.

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Tuscan Bouquet Art Print by Nicole Etienne

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Tuscan Bouquet Art Print by Nicole Etienne

tuscan bouquet art print, nicole etienne artworks, still life paintings, floral and botanical art prints, decorative art prints

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Claude Monet and Sunflowers Art Print

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Sunflowers by Claude Monet Print
Sunflowers by Claude Monet by LeAnnS123
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Sunflowers by Claude Monet

On the days Claude Monet could not go outside and paint, he stayed inside and painted still-lifes. He always enthusiastically embraced the outdoors and “plein-air” painting in order to study the change of light outdoors.

But when he painted his sunflowers he must have brought the outdoors inside as they are filled with the energy of the wind and the colors of the outdoor lights.

It isn’t known if Van Gogh ever saw Monet’s “Sunflowers” painting. In one week Van Gogh had painted four sunflower paintings with extreme enthusiasm. Van Gogh liked to study the harmony of the color of the flowers together with the background colors. Yellow may have been Van Gogh’s favorite color because it helped him feel more cheerful and less depressed.

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A Vase of Roses by Vincent Van Gogh

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A Vase of Roses by Vincent Van Gogh

a vase of roses art print, decorative art, dutch masters, Impressionism, Modern Art, modern masters, Vincent Van Gogh

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Decorative Art: Six Green Leaves by Nicole Marley

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Decorative Art: Six Green Leaves by Nicole Marley

abstract collage, Cafe Decoration, decorative art, Female Artists, floral and botanical, nicole marley, six green leaves art print, theme rooms

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White Lilac in Glass Vase by Edouard Manet

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White Lilac in Glass Vase by Edouard Manet

None of the colorists of Manet’s generation made men forget the colorist Delacroix; everything, or nearly everything, that tends to their glory increases his fame; he was their god. Delacroix’ color had come too early for the weakness of humanity. When the trappings of Romanticism were cleared away, his palette was thrown aside as one of its accessories. After the strong and healthy recognition of reality by the great landscape school of 1830 and the realism of the school of Courbet, painters were impelled to get at a right distance from Nature; this was the logical way between the two manifestations that had come to an end.

As soon as it was consciously recognised, the method of Daumier and of Delacroix was necessarily decisive. Why this way is modern, and why it achieves results which respond to vital and weighty needs, I hope at least to indicate in due course. The consciousness of this is a piece of modern culture. It is rooted in the postulate that Manet and his circle gave us not Nature, but the natural, and that all naturalisation of our instincts, i.e., all sharpening, purification, and amelioration, is modern.

Every joy is progress, and so therefore was Manet’s achievement. That achievement and its results had never occurred even to the magician Rubens, and, going through the whole history of art, we may find something similar, but never quite the same decisive consciousness. There are other values, the perfection of which put us to the blush, but in spite of this we would not exchange for them our own, the resplendent symbol of our best aspirations, our happiness, our epoch.

Manet discovered, to the horrified amazement of the world, that a fine feminine skin is neither yellow nor brown, but luminously white in the light, especially in juxtaposition to dark colours, and that blood pulses, that nerves and senses throb beneath it. Manet completed Courbet’s material, and refrained from any sort of formulation, in one sense or the other.

He made those elements of the material that seemed to him vital to his manner greater and firmer; not in order to subject it the more intelligibly to an idea, a theory, but rather to make it as vital as possible, capable of producing the effect of unity, and so of style; a strong, original organism, beautiful by that which makes it organic.

This is the ancient process common to all great–that is to say, to all instinctive–epochs, when artists were unconscious of any obligation to create for the pleasure of others. Manet discovered a new unity; no new law, as the aberrations of modern criticism would have us believe, but a new means of working out the old law.

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