Category: Articles & Art Resources

Musique by Gustav Klimt

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Musique by Gustav Klimt

From 1876 to 1883 Gustav Klimt attended the Vienna School of Arts and Crafts and from 1879 he started working with his brother Ernst Klimt on decorative paintings, designed for public buildings in Vienna, Bucharest and Rijeka. In 1897 Klimt was one of the founding members of the Vienna Secession. He was chairman until he resigned in 1905. Gustav Klimt created a new and highly individual style in the Austrian art world. He broke with the conventional academic ideals.

Especially Klimt’s later work is defined by the use of intensive colors, golden backgrounds, ornamental layouts, erotic elements and heavy symbolism. Although his work was controversal, Klimt had a strong influence on the cultural world of his time and established himself as a very popular painter in the Viennese society. In Vienna’s museums you can admire some of his most famous works. The Museum of Applied Arts is proud of its collection.

At the Belvedere you can take in ‘Der Kuss’ (The Kiss) in all its glory. The Kiss is probably now one of the most famous pictures in the world and is to be found everywhere from apartments to hotel lobbies

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Gaul Statue and Antique Civilisation Under the Roman Rule

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Gaul Statue and Antique Civilisation Under the Roman Rule

Gaul, as a whole, began to participate in antique civilisation under the Roman rule. A highly centralised administration united the provinces which extended from the Rhine to the Pyrenees, from the ocean to the Alps, imposing a common existence and a common culture upon them.

When one travels along a Roman road it is very easy to understand how the dwellers in these regions were sensible of a distant solidarity. Their roads, even when disused, are not obliterated; they still indicate the ancient route across fields. Stretching in purposeful rigidity from point to point, regardless of mountains and valleys, they bore the legions to the frontier, and carried the will of Rome into the interior.

Every halting-place along them was the nucleus of a future city of France. At the cross-roads we shall find the active centres of Roman art. A network of more natural and less geometrical highways, corresponding to the local geology, was related to this vast system of main roads. And yet the extremities, from Arles to Cologne, from Lyons to Saintes, felt that they were members of one body. Thus the solid causeways, built for eternity, were the channels of human intercourse during the Middle Ages; they transported pilgrims and merchants to sanctuaries and fairs respectively. From Burgundy to Provence, from Tours to Roncevaux, they maintained uninterrupted communication, even when these provinces were no longer united by Roman centralisation.

The conquerors brought their Latin habits with them; buildings akin to those of Italy rose in the cities where they established themselves; an official art, easily imposed on a country innocent of architecture, and immune from all local influence, manifested its identity at Narbonne, Bordeaux, and Reims: it was an urban and utilitarian art, created for the enjoyment of great cities. After the decay of Marseilles, Narbonne and Fréjus rose to importance, and close at hand, Orange and Nîmes, whose ancient monuments are among the finest in the world.

Arles, the Rome of Gaul, began her glorious existence as a capital, a city of luxury, art, and pleasure. But this municipal clvilisation soon outgrew Provence. Municipalities raised triumphal arches dedicated to emperors; Trèves, Reims, Besançon, Langres and Saintes have preserved these proud structures. Towns of second and third rate importance had their amphitheatres; the more wealthy among them boasted thermae. Temples were no doubt numerous; they disappeared to furnish columns for the new basilicas of youthful Christianity.

Around the great cities rose the rich villas of the Gallic aristocracy, and beyond these a vague population, the Pagani, long recalcitrant to Latinism and subsequently to Christianity. Roman culture had penetrated only into the towns; but monkish hosts ploughed the fallows of the countryside; after the municipal art of the Gallo- Romans came the rural art of the Romanesque epoch.

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Surrealism: Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate

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Surrealism: Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate

Surrealism is a literary and art movement influenced by Freudianism and dedicated to the expression of imagination as revealed in dreams, free of the conscious control of reason and free of convention. The movement was founded (1924) in Paris by André Breton, with his Manifeste du surréalisme, but its ancestry is traced to the French poets Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, and to the Italian painter, Giorgio de Chirico. Many of its adherents had belonged to the Dada movement. In literature, surrealism was confined almost exclusively to France.

Surrealist writers were interested in the associations and implications of words rather than their literal meanings; their works are thus extraordinarily difficult to read. Among the leading surrealist writers were Louis Aragon, Paul Éluard, Robert Desnos, and Jean Cocteau, the last noted particularly for his surreal films. In art the movement became dominant in the 1920s and 30s and was internationally practiced with many and varied forms of expression.

Salvador Dalí and Yves Tanguy used dreamlike perception of space and dream-inspired symbols such as melting watches and huge metronomes. Max Ernst and René Magritte constructed fantastic imagery from startling combinations of incongruous elements of reality painted with photographic attention to detail.

These artists have been labeled as verists because their paintings involve transformations of the real world. “Absolute” surrealism depends upon images derived from psychic automatism, the subconscious, or spontaneous thought. Works by Joan Miró and André Masson are in this vein. The movement survived but was greatly diminished after World War II.

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Tuscany Dreams by Barbara Felisky

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Tuscany Dreams by Barbara Felisky

Barbara Felisky

Rosbe Felisky Barbara is known for rich impressionist paintings of gardens and landscapes. The afternoon sun warming a wall in Provence, an embankment of towering rhododendrons spilling into the moat of a ruined castle, or a glorious profusion of roses climbing over the garden gate brick, all give a feeling of tranquility and respect in an all-too-often hectic world.

Travel is an important facet of life’s Felisky. His frequent travels a source of inspiration and material for his images of Provence, Tuscany, the Amalfi Coast, Italy Lake District, the vineyards of California, and, of course, English gardens. Each year, she seeks a new area to explore and photograph, back to the studio refreshed and revitalized.

However, in England, with the pull of its landscapes and gardens, still holds a special fascination. rich and colorful palette Felisky understand the nuances of exciting flowers and shrubs, while the stone walls, bridges, garden ponds, roads and draw the viewer deep into the calm tranquil English countryside. As a change of pace, she often paints flowers and paintings of still lifes in the family home and folk furniture and objects.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Felisky currently resides in Southern California, painting a day in his studio. She received a BA in Art and Education from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. To continue to develop their skills, Felisky studied oil painting with a number of artists from California and the development under Fredrick Odell. Using the knowledge she has acquired during his studies while working as an artist and professional Felisky taught drawing and oil painting of school age and adult students. His time is now spent on traveling and create new images to satisfy his series on new and old.

Felisky, whose biography appears in Who’s Who in American Art, has also been featured in American Artist magazine on a number of occasions. Her own article “Search Levitan” published in July 1988 of the magazine. His work has been shown in a number of major juried exhibitions and featured in numerous exhibitions in galleries.

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Expressionism: Transforming Nature Rather Than Imitating

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Woman in Green Jacket by Auguste Macke

Expressionism is a term used to describe works of art and literature in which the representation of reality is distorted to communicate an inner vision. The expressionist transforms nature rather than imitates it.

In painting and the graphic arts, certain movements such as the Brücke (1905), Blaue Reiter (1911), and new objectivity (1920s) are described as expressionist. In a broader sense the term also applies to certain artists who worked independent of recognized schools or movements, e.g., Rouault, Soutine, and Vlaminck in France and Kokoschka and Schiele in Austria—all of whom made aggressively executed, personal, and often visionary paintings. Gauguin, Ensor, Van Gogh, and Munch were the spiritual fathers of the 20th-century expressionist movements, and certain earlier artists, notably El Greco, Grünewald, and Goya exhibit striking parallels to modern expressionistic sensibility. See articles on individuals, e.g., Ensor.

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The Tree of Life, Stoclet Frieze, c.1909

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The Tree of Life, Stoclet Frieze, c.1909

About the Artwork

Symbolizing spiritual enlightenment and the union of heaven and earth, “Tree of Life” portrays a universal motif in a unique context of curlicues and gleaming gold leaf. Created by renowned Viennese Secession and Art Nouveau genius Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), the piece features the lavish ornamentation and gold embellishments prominent in his work. A forerunner of Modernism and the Art Deco movements, Klimt’s enormous creative influence still resonates in modern art, decorations and jewelry.

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