Category: Digital Art

Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

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Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

Spontaneity. With no pretense, or explanation, Ruth Palmer paints contemporary abstracts by feeling her way through the process and connecting to the soul of the subject, without concern for distinctions between representation and abstraction.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Palmer now resides in Calgary, Canada. While her primary influence is spiritual, based in Christianity; her art is also influenced by the richness of Manet’s impressionist works and what she deems the “colorful play and balance” of Kandinsky’s. Like Kandinsky, for whom spiritual influences counted heavily, there’s a certain intentional separation with Palmer’s art that allows viewers to participate in creating the artwork. The disunion is repaired when the painted form connects to the viewer’s soul.

Ruth’s works are extremely popular in print, particularly in the design market and hospitality industry. Her paintings and digital renderings can be enjoyed in many hotels and corporate offices worldwide. Recently Ruth was asked to create a collection for installation on one of Pullmantur’s new cruise ships and one of her best-selling pieces “Luscious Red” can be found in the new release of “The Spirituality Of Sex” by Wood Lake Publishing – a Canadian Christian Publisher.

Original paintings are currently in private collections throughout Canada, the United States, Australia, England and Scandinavia.

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What is Manga?

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Morning Star by Masamune Shirow

Many people might say “Manga are Japanese comics, and Anime is the Japanese version of animation. Anime is usually, but not always, the animated version of popular manga.” That’s partially true, but it can be misleading. (Note that “anime” in Japan technically means any animated film, and “manga” is any printed cartoon, but people in the rest of the world take them to mean animated films or comics from Japan.)

First of all, though an outsider might think Japan “stole” comics from the West, this is not true. Japan has been making cartoonish art for a very long time (there are humorous ink drawings of animals and caricatured people from hundreds of years ago, bearing striking resemblances to modern manga). True, some aspects of manga are taken from the West (Osamu Tezuka, the “father” of modern manga, was influenced by Disney and Max Fleisher), but its main features, such as simple lines and stylized features, are distinctly Japanese. It may be that Chinese art had more influence than Western.

(Also, speaking of China, I should note that Anime is now a general Asian phenomenon, not just Japanese. I understand there are many fine works of manga and anime being produced in many places around the world. However, as far as I understand, the roots are in Japan, and Japan is still considered, at least here in the US, the center of the anime world. This may well change in the future.)

The Ghost in the Shell by Masamune Shirow

Secondly, Japanese manga and anime come in all types, for all sorts of people. Unlike the U.S., which generally seems to believe that “comics are for kids” (though this has been changing recently), Japanese manga-ka (manga writers) write for everyone from innocent young children to perverted sex-starved men (there is even a category for ex-juvenile delinquent mothers!). But even the kiddie stuff tends not to be as simple-minded as the American versions (not including intelligent American comics, but more thinking of TV shows).

Children’s manga and TV anime shows in Japan will sometimes depict death — while the U.S. (on children’s TV) seems determined to run away from such realities of life (note how the U.S. version of “GoLion” (“Voltron”) deleted all references to one of the protagonist’s death). And, not surprisingly, much of Japanese manga and anime includes scenes of students in class or doing homework, or of people working in their offices. The work ethic seems omnipresent in the background. Manga and anime also tend to protray technology sympathetically, while some U.S. comics seem almost to avoid it, or revile it, or simplify it as much as possible.

A third major difference is the unique Japanese manga and anime style, which is distinctive and fairly easy to recognize. This is not to say the style is limiting. Within this broad common stylistic ground, each manga artist’s technique is distinct and unique. The stereotype is of characters with huge hair and large eyes, but there are many, many variations, from L. Matsumoto’s seemingly unevenly drawn squash-shaped “ugly” protagonists, to the soft-edged figures in Miyazaki’s work. And, of course, there is less emphasis on the “superhero” world of the U.S..

In most manga, the men and women aren’t necessarily exaggerated extremes of their gender stereotypes, and they wear things other than skin-tight costumes. In fact, manga and anime characters tend to have unique and aesthetic tastes in fashion. (It’s also true that many modern U.S. comics have thankfully broken this stereotype, and serious-matter cartoonists like Alan Moore or Art Spiegelman have always been around.)

And one minor difference between Japanese manga and general superhero comics like D.C. Comics or Marvel Comics (aside from the black and white nature of manga), is that manga are usually the vision of a single writer (though editors have a large say, and sometimes direct the story). Unlike the general superhero type, where many writers tend to do different plots and stories, manga are more like novels, complete and detailed worlds that are the vision of a single author.

The characters remain consistent, and they are allowed to grow and develop. On a related topic, manga also tend to be drawn for a weekly or biweekly publication containing numerous other comics by other authors — and the editors expect cliffhangers/you-really-want-to-read-the-next-issue endings each time. So the plot HAS to develop and HAS to be interesting at a fairly rapid clip. (There are, after all, crowds of hopeful would-be manga-ka waiting in the wings).

(One last difference is the onomatopoetic characteristic of the Japanese language; sound effects fit in much better, and look less stupid, than in English comics. This is just a facet of the language; translated manga sound effects also don’t work as well.)

Perhaps it is the mix of harsh reality with the tantalizing world of fantasy that makes Japanese manga and anime so appealing. Many popular series, such as Doraemon, Ranma 1/2 and Kimagure Orange Road, follow the lives of seemingly ordinary people — they go to school, do homework, get reprimanded by parents — who have a shadow life that makes them somehow special, whether by psionic talent or friends who are rather different (robots from the future, or aliens from other worlds). I suppose all this serves to allow the reader to sympathize with the characters, and yet escape from bland, normal daily life to a fantasy world that is far different.

Even in worlds that exist in the far future, or long ago, the reader is drawn into a 3-dimensional character, one who is far from perfect, one who has stupid little habits or major character flaws — and who has hopes and dreams that the reader can sympathize with. Unlike some American super heroes, who often seem to just go around defeating Evil (as wonderfully spoofed in American comic “The Tick”), Japanese characters usually have other goals in life that play large themes within their lives. I heard recently the characterization that manga and anime are “character oriented.” The more I think about, the more I think this is the right description. Characters aren’t forced into plots, like a foot into a too-tight shoe; instead, stories grow out of the characters. The heart of manga and anime is in the hearts of the characters.

That brings us to three other aspects of manga and anime that I really like: the reality of the world, the spirituality, and the fact that things end.

With comics, the merging of art and words creates a unique medium. The art pulls in the mind, and the words make the reality. A picture may be worth a thousand words, while words may convey what art cannot, but the two types together are truly powerful. As for Anime, animation can do inexpensively what special effects crews couldn’t even touch until the recent rise of computer graphics. Art is a limited form of virtual reality. Art, however, requires plot to make a story come to life.

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Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

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Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

Spontaneity. With no pretense, or explanation, Ruth Palmer paints contemporary abstracts by feeling her way through the process and connecting to the soul of the subject, without concern for distinctions between representation and abstraction.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Palmer now resides in Calgary, Canada. While her primary influence is spiritual, based in Christianity; her art is also influenced by the richness of Manet’s impressionist works and what she deems the “colorful play and balance” of Kandinsky’s. Like Kandinsky, for whom spiritual influences counted heavily, there’s a certain intentional separation with Palmer’s art that allows viewers to participate in creating the artwork. The disunion is repaired when the painted form connects to the viewer’s soul.

Ruth Palmer: Colorful Play and Balance

Ruth’s works are extremely popular in print, particularly in the design market and hospitality industry. Her paintings and digital renderings can be enjoyed in many hotels and corporate offices worldwide. Recently Ruth was asked to create a collection for installation on one of Pullmantur’s new cruise ships and one of her best-selling pieces “Luscious Red” can be found in the new release of “The Spirituality Of Sex” by Wood Lake Publishing – a Canadian Christian Publisher.

Original paintings are currently in private collections throughout Canada, the United States, Australia, England and Scandinavia.

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Abstract Circles: Silver Satellites

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Abstract Circles: Silver Satellites

We are no longer concerned with the abstract and ideal work of art, it seems that we may now reasonably appeal to those theories which we before found inadequate only because they did not account for the purely aesthetic qualities of artistic activity.

The play-impulse, the impulse to attract by pleasing, the imitative impulse, etc., although they give us no information as to the essentially artistic criterion, may nevertheless have called into existence works and manifestations which fulfil the requirements of the several art-forms.

Man may have composed dramas, may have painted pictures, may have made poems, in play, or out of the desire to please, or out of the inborn taste for mimicry. In particular the play-impulse must, as we have already admitted in the first part of this work, be dealt with as a factor of incalculable importance in the history of art.

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Grand Canal by Moonlight, Venice, Italy Art Print

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Grand Canal by Moonlight, Venice, Italy Art Print
Grand Canal by Moonlight, Venice, Italy Art Print by eyecandy
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Grand Canal by Moonlight, Venice, Italy Art Print

High resolution poster of the Grand Canal in Italy. Very romantic view by moonlight.

A beautiful, one-of-a-kind photochrom print of the Grand Canal by moonlight. The photochrom process was one of the earliest efforts at bringing color to photography. It used high quality color inks which were laid down on paper with multiple lithographic stones, creating a beautiful hand-colored rendering. An application of a varnish coat gave the print a lustrous quality and added a depth and richness often found in more modern color photographs.

These factors contributed to a unique and distinct print quality. This print would make an excellent gift for a friend, family member, or co-worker, or wall hanging for your private collection. It beckons a deep appreciation and warmness of times gone by.

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Romantic Moonlight Posters

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Romantic Moonlight print
Romantic Moonlight by Dreamscenery
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Romantic Moonlight Posters

A eutopian moonlit night, sharing the night with someone you love.

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New York City at Night Poster

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Retro Style New York City Poster
Retro Style New York City Poster by made_in_atlantis
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NYC at Night Poster print
NYC at Night Poster by newyork_newyork
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New York City at Night Poster

This NYC at night poster is a keepsake. Beautiful lights of the city illuminate the skyline.

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Vintage Travel Paris Canvas Print

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Vintage Travel Paris wrappedcanvas
Vintage Travel Paris by CollageMontage
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Vintage Travel Paris Canvas Print

Digital collage using vintage travel postcard of the Eiffel Tower, a vintage map of Paris, vintage lettering and signature, and vintage product label. Collage art by Lorrie Morrison.

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I Feel Great – Original Abstract Art

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I Feel Great- Original Abstract Art wrappedcanvas
I Feel Great- Original Abstract Art by artOnWear
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I Feel Great – Original Abstract Art

Available on products and as a poster. Abstract and colorful art titled “I Feel Great”. Check out more geometric art from Zazzle market place.

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Secret Meeting Abstract Premium Canvas Print

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Secret Meeting wrappedcanvas
Secret Meeting by artOnWear
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Premium Canvas (Gloss)

Zazzle’s gloss canvas is made from an additive-free cotton-poly blend and features a special ink-receptive coating that protects the printed surface from cracking when stretched. Made with a tight weave ideal for any photography or fine art, our instant-dry gloss canvas produces prints that are fade-resistant for 100+ years.

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