Category: Educational Prints & Posters

Photography Art: Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989

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Photography Art: Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989

The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, also known as the Tiananmen Square massacre and the June Fourth Incident (in part to avoid confusion with two prior Tiananmen Square protests), were a series of demonstrations in and near Tiananmen Square in Beijing in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) beginning on 14 April 1989. The movement, influenced partly by the ideas of Mohandas K. Gandhi, used mainly non-violent methods and can be considered a case of civil resistance. Led mainly by students and intellectuals, the protests occurred in the year that was to see the collapse of a number of communist governments in eastern Europe.

The protests were sparked by the death of former CPC General Secretary Hu Yaobang, a Party official known for tolerating dissent, and whom protesters had wanted to mourn. By the eve of Hu’s funeral, 100,000 people had gathered at Tiananmen Square. The protests lacked a unified cause or leadership; participants included Communist Party of China members and Trotskyists as well as liberal reformers, who were generally against the government’s authoritarianism and voiced calls for economic change and democratic reform within the structure of the government. The demonstrations began in Tiananmen Square, but later expanded to the surrounding streets, and large-scale protests also occurred in cities throughout China, including Shanghai. While those in Shanghai remained peaceful, there was looting and rioting in various locations throughout China, including Xi’an Province and Changsha, capital of Mao’s home province of Hunan.

The movement lasted seven weeks after Hu’s death on 15 April. In early June, the People’s Liberation Army moved into the streets of Beijing with troops and tanks and cleared the square with live fire. The exact number of deaths is not known. According to an analysis by Nicholas D. Kristof of The New York Times, “The true number of deaths will probably never be known, and it is possible that thousands of people were killed without leaving evidence behind. But based on the evidence that is now available, it seems plausible that about fifty soldiers and policemen were killed, along with 400 to 800 civilians.” Globe and Mail correspondent Jan Wong placed the death toll at approximately 3,000, based on initial reports by the Red Cross and analysis on the crowd size, density, and the volume of firing.

Following the conflict, the government conducted widespread arrests of protesters and their supporters, cracked down on other protests around China, banned the foreign press from the country and strictly controlled coverage of the events in the PRC press. Members of the Party who had publicly sympathized with the protesters were purged, with several high-ranking members placed under house arrest, such as Party General Secretary Zhao Ziyang. There was widespread international condemnation of the PRC government’s use of force against the protesters.

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The Tibetian Wheel of Life

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The Tibetian Wheel of Life

The Wheel of Life symbolizes the Tibetan Buddhist perspective on life and it contains many themes and symbols of Buddhist teachings.

The creature turns the wheel of life and it holds in its claws is Yama, a wrathful deity and the Lord of Death. Yama symbolizes the inevitability of death, samsara and the impermanence of all things. This does not lead to despair, however, because outside of the wheel is the Buddha, who shows the way to liberation (symbolized by the moon).

The inner circle of the wheel contains symbols of the three root delusions: hatred (snake), ignorance (rooster), and greed (pork).

The ring around the center is the karma, with the numbers on the left to climb to more realms of existence because of virtuous actions, and the numbers on the right descending to the lower realms of existence because of bad deeds or ignorant.

The central ring of the wheel (the areas between the spokes) symbolizes the six realms of existence. The upper half, left to right, represent the three highest spheres of life: humans, gods and demigods. The bottom half shows the three lower realms of existence: animals, hell beings and hungry ghosts.

The outer ring represents the 12 original dependent relationship, as follows:

Right next to the upper part is a blind man with his cane, which is ignorance of the true nature of the world.

Moving clockwise, a potter molding a pot symbolizes that we shape our own destiny with our actions throughout the operation of karma.

Monkey climbing a tree represents consciousness or mind, which wanders aimlessly and out of control.

Consciousness gives rise to name and form, which is symbolized by persons traveling in a boat on the river of life.

The next link is an empty house, doors and windows that symbolize the sense organs in development. Buddha has six senses: sight, smell, taste, hearing, touch and thought.

The six senses allow us to have contact with the world, which is symbolized by lovers embracing.

Contact born of feeling, which we classify as pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. Feelings are represented on the wheel like an arrow piercing the eye.

Feeling born of desire or attachment to pleasant feelings and experiences, symbolized by a couple falling in love or drinking man.

Desire or attachment leads to grasp for an object of desire, symbolized by a monkey picking fruit.

Capture the existence arises, represented by a man and woman making love.

Existence culminates in the birth (entry into the human realm), which is symbolized by a woman in childbirth.

Birth naturally leads to aging and death, which is symbolized by an old man carrying a burden.

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Egyptian Figures: Nefertiti, the Great Royal Wife of Akhenaten

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Egyptian Figures: Nefertiti, the Great Royal Wife of Akhenaten

Nefertiti (c. 1370 BC – c. 1330 BC) was the Great Royal Wife (chief consort) of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti and her husband were known for a religious revolution, in which they started to worship one god only. This was Aten, or the sun disc.

Nefertiti had many titles; for example, at Karnak are inscriptions that read Heiress, Great of Favours, Possessed of Charm, Exuding Happiness, Mistress of Sweetness, Beloved One, Soothing the King’s Heart in His House, Soft-spoken in All, Mistress of Upper and Lower Egypt, Great King’s Wife, Whom He Loves, Lady of the Two Lands, Nefertiti.

She was made famous by her bust, now in Berlin’s Neues Museum, shown to the right. The bust is one of the most copied works of ancient Egypt. It was attributed to the sculptor Thutmose, and it was found in his workshop. The bust is notable for exemplifying the understanding Ancient Egyptians had regarding realistic facial proportions. Some scholars believe that Nefertiti ruled briefly after her husband’s death and before the accession of Tutankhamun as Smenkhkare, although this identification is a matter of ongoing debate.

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Vintage Art: Map Showing the Extent of the Roman Empire

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Vintage Art: Map Showing the Extent of the Roman Empire

educational posters, educational print, Giclee Prints, Mary Evans Collection, roman empire maps, vintage art, vintage maps

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Presidents of the United States of America Postcard

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Presidents of the United States of America Postcard
Presidents of the United States of America Postcard by HTMimages
Create a postcard at Zazzle

presidents of the united states art print, politics posters, americana posters, americana art prints, us presidents posters, politics art prints

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Hindenburg Explosion Poster

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<Hindenburg> Explosion Posters
<Hindenburg> Explosion Posters by corbisimages
View Hindenburg Posters online at zazzle
Hindenburg Explosion

The Hindenburg was the beginning and the end of the transatlantic airships. This 804-foot airship filled with more than 7 million cubic feet of hydrogen is a culmination of his age. Never before or since has a larger aircraft flight taken. However, the explosion of the Hindenburg changed the landscape of lighter-than air craft forever.

May 6, 1937, the Hindenburg carrying 61 crew members and 36 passengers arrived hours late at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. Bad weather forced the delay. Shaken by the wind and rain, the craft hovered in the region by most accounts for about one hour. The presence of storms were recorded. The landing of the Hindenburg with these types of conditions contrary to the regulations.

However, when the Hindenburg began its landing, the weather was clear. The Hindenburg seems to have been moving at a speed fast enough for landing and for any reason, the captain attempted a high landing, being winched to the ground from a height of about 200 feet. Shortly after the ropes have been fixed, some witnesses reported a blue glow over the Hindenburg followed by a flame toward the rear of the machine.

The flame was almost simultaneously replaced by an explosion that quickly engulfed the craft causing it to crash into the ground killing 36 people. Spectators watched in horror as the crew and passengers were burned alive or jumped to his death. As Herb Morrison announced on the radio: “It’s on fire…. Get out of the way, please, oh, it’s terrible… Oh, the humanity and all the passengers.”

The day after this horrible tragedy occurred, the newspapers began to speculate on the cause of the disaster. Until this incident, German zeppelins were safe and very successful. Many theories have been discussed and studied: sabotage, mechanical breakdown, hydrogen explosions, lightning, or even the possibility that he was shot in the sky.

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WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun Posters

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WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun print
WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun by Photoblog
View other Vintage world war one photos Posters

WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun Posters

Old photo of U.S. Army soldiers riding World War One machine gun mounted on motorcycle with sidecar. Probably taken in 1910s.

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Patriotic Art: Vietnam Reflections

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Patriotic Art: Vietnam Reflections

vietnam reflections, stretched canvas prints, canvas art, patriotic posters, americana posters, vietnam art prints, educational posters, decorative art prints

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Heart and Soul American Flag Art Print

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American Flag Freedom American Eagle Poster
American Flag Freedom American Eagle Poster by made_in_atlantis
Browse more American bald eagle face head Posters at Zazzle

heart and soul poster, american flag posters, july 4th posters, patriotic posters, american eagle posters, world cultures, educational posters, americana posters, american patroitism posters

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Religion Art: The Ten Commandments

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Religion Art: The Ten Commandments

The Ten Commandments

1. Thou shalt have no other gods before me.
2. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image.
3. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.
4. Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy.
5. Honor thy Father & thy Mother.
6. Thou shalt not kill.
7. Thou shalt not commit adultery.
8. Thou shalt not steal.
9. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.
10. Thou shalt not covet.

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