Category: Giclee Prints

Everything Reminds Me of Her Art Print

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Everything Reminds Me of Her Art Print

everything reminds me of her, giclee prints, figurative art prints, alex cherry artworks, decorative art prints

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Expressionism, Realism and Van Gogh

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The Night Cafe
Vincent Van Gogh
Giclee Print
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Expressionism, Realism and Van Gogh

For expressionism is not simply a way of seeing things: it is also a way of making them, of painting them. An expressionist does not paint “flat” and in pure tones–he breaks up his tones and applies them with a liberal brush. It is striking indeed to find in Rembrandt, Hals, and the Van Gogh of the Nuenen period, the same concern for realism, the same sense of light and feeling for expressive detail, combined with a use of impasto that is no less expressive.

In short, even the most detached and idealistic Dutch painters bear the mark of their national cultural traditions. Vermeer, however abstract, came under the infleunce of Caravaggio, that is to say, of realism; and, in our own time, Mondrian’s abstractions represent an unusual aesthetic puritanism with a social bias. And Rembrandt’s light is the spiritual expression of an observed reality–or at least of such elements of that reality as may be observed.
But such realism, however frank (as in Frans Hals), is not so much concerned to respect the real, the physical aspect of things, as to express it. And while Van Gogh, as a Dutch painter, was certainly deeply attached to reality, his almost religious deference for it was not divorced from painterly considerations.

Hence that arbitrary lighting, that no less arbitrary, dramatic and often caricatural distortion–in short, that rugged, uncouth expressionism in which there is nevertheless a glimmer of the total lyrical expression that would later be his. So it is that this essentially lyric painter began by painting the plebeian reality of his time, just as–he must have imagined–Rembrandt and Hals painted the bourgeois reality of theirs. The Head of an Old Peasant Woman, painted at Nuenen, and the hands of the Potato-Eaters thus echo in their crude, awkward way the Portrait of Margaretha Trip and the hands of the Regentessen.

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Abstract: Twisting Love Art Print

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Abstract: Twisting Love Art Print
Megan Aroon Duncanson
Giclee Print
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twisting love art print, giclee prints, megan aroon duncanson artworks, abstract expressionism, modern art prints, contemporary art, decorative art prints, cafe decoration

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The Blonde with Bare Breasts by Edouard Manet

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The Blonde with Bare Breasts by Edouard Manet

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Vintage Travel Ads: Tahiti Wahine Hula Dance Giclee Print

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Tahiti: Wahine Hula Dance Giclee Print

Tahiti, which is 2,400 mile due South Honolulu, is the archetypal South Sea Island, the granddady of all the legends and object of the dreams of many generations of bored city people. The very name is synonmymous with wavng palms and grass skirts, native drums, Gauguin, coconuts, happy people and tribal dancing. Probably it was like that. These days people in Papeete, Tahiti’s capital, moan about all the changes. The tourist has arrived. Purists long for the ‘old days’ – not for the ‘real’ Tahiti 200 or 250 years ago, but for Tahiti in the 20s, when Papeete was tacky and ramshackle, covered in bougaivillaea and hibiscus, and the old Tiare Hotel was the only center of social activity. Today the rambling shanty of a water-front has disappeared behind the clean, concrete sweep of a two lane highway and there is an efficient, modern port.

It hasn’t all disappeared however; large sections of Papeete, much of the island of Tahiti itself and certainly many of the other islands (Moorea, Bora Bora, and Tahaa), offer the expected retreats, complete peace and quiet and palms. And Tahiti has its odd, exotic mixyure of peoples – the French Government officials, the Chinese shopkeepers, the European and American settlers and the Tahitians themselves.

vintage travel ads, tahiti posters, vintage tahiti posters, wahine hula dance posters, illustration art, best sellers, travel posters, vintage illustrations, dance and dancers, cafe decoration, figurative art, giclee prints

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Propaganda Art: Vladimir Lenin Addressing a Moscow Crowd

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Vladimir Lenin Addressing a Moscow Crowd Giclee Print

From earliest times the migrations of Huns and Tartars, the civilizations of ancient Greece, Byzantium and Islam, have left their mark on the eight million square miles of USSR. But in only a little more than 50 years Russia has risen from a feudal economy to the world’s second most powerful industrial state. The diversity of her peoples, climate and lansdscape was reflected in painting, music, dance and architecture, literature and drama. Moscow was a microcosm of the Soviet Union for there you can see Tartars, Ukrainians, Uzbeks and Georgians working and studying together. Inside the Kremlin was the Supreme Soviet which unites the union. In 15 seperate republics you would not expect to find the same traditions or attitudes of life; Asiatic Russia still retains its oriental family traditions; in the Caucasus there were men and women who live to prodigious ages; the Ukrainians were descended from the Cossack horsemen and the Mongolians from Genghis Khan.

Tourism in the USSR was organized; even the seven-day journey to Siberia on the Trans-Siberian express is comfortable and efficient. The network of low-price transportation had opened the USSR to tourists. Everywhere you would meet citiens who were understandably in you.

propaganda posters, lenin posters, communism posters, communism, soviet union posters, cccp posters, moscow posters, mary evans collection, figurative art, vintage art posters, world cultures, educational prints

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The New Woman and the Twenties

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The New Woman and the Twenties

The twenties likewise saw a form of art, music–that Britain for two centuries had chiefly regarded as an alien importation from the Continent–at length achieving a new status, as major native composers awakened the interest of an alert and educated public. Although the fashions gaining ground before World War I prefigured the “modernism” of the 1920s, it was only in the hedonism and boom atmosphere of the Jazz Age that the revolution in women’ s dothing begun before 1914 was finally accomplished.

In England, the decade of the 1920’s was characterized by an extraordinary deprovincializing of cultural life. No longer did Britain seem so separated from the Continent as it had once been; no longer were the British themselves so satisfied with their traditional island ways. Now they were much more ready to learn from the French and the Germans, the Russians and the Austrians.

The wartime experience of young European women from the middle and upper classes in situations where they could no longer constantly be chaperoned, and the casualty toll that devastated a whole generation of young men, meant that with the dawn of the 1920s a new kind of single woman – independent, self-sufficient, adventurous – stepped on to the social stage.

The New Woman and the Twenties

About the time of the World War I, Fifth Avenue became the country’s leading fashion center: the Fifth Avenue label represented the best in American taste. World War I had also expanded employment opportunities for women in the affected nations. Women munitions workers, better paid than working-class women had ever been, appeared on the streets wearing makeup and dressed in seal and musquash fur coats. The mutilations caused by the war itself advanced plastic surgery, and indirectly promoted makeup as well.

In the 19th century painters had arranged their female sitters in static poses in gorgeously elaborate plumage; the wives and daughters of rich men almost became luxury objects to be looked at. By the 1920s a more typical fashion image was the photograph, which captured the model as she sprang across a puddle in the street, or disported herself in a bathing suit or at the races.

The fashionable woman of the 1920s was associated with speed, daring and travel. Movement was the key to the new fashions. In a few short years, from being enveloped in yards of material that was buttoned, laced and hooked to swaddle and constrain, women’s bodies were set free in the simplest of shifts that left arms, legs and necks shockingly bare, while hair was cropped and brilliantined. Faces, by contrast, were openly and brightly painted. Women smoked, drank, swore and made love in a manner that would have ruined their reputations 30 years earlier.

The influence of sportswear on fashion was even more obvious at this period than before World War I, Suzanne Lenglen, the dynamic French tennis star of the twenties, was dressed both on and off the court by Jean Patou, and her ordinary dothes looked hardly different from her on-court outfits. Brief pleated skirts, thin stockings, simple strap or laced shoes, a long straight cardigan and plain shirt was one version of the new unifonn for women.

Among the fashion designers, more influential even than Patou or Mmes. Vionnet and Lanvin, who revolutionized the cut of clothing (Madame Vionnet invented the bias cut) was Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel. Her designs dominated the fashion esthetic of the decade, but her work also bridged the prewar and postwar epochs, for she had already been experimenting with sports designs and materials before 1914.

She, like Redfems, had sensed the possibilities of women’s riding wear, but she went much farther. She seized upon materials previously used only for male sporting garb and underwear – locknit, jersey and grey flannel – as a revolutionary new medium for her designs. By 1913 she was devising cardigans and sweaters (until then wom only by fishermen and agricultural laborers) as fashion garments, and by the 1920s she had created an entirely new mode: she replaced the gorgeous colors and yards of silk with beige cashmere, black wool crepe and men’s suitings.

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Gladiators in the Arena Giclee Print

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Gladiators in the Arena Giclee Print

No stay in Rome will be long enough to enable you to enjoy all its splendors, nor can we do more here than point you in the right direction. These are excellent guided tours and you should take volumes of literature to read.

In Rome’s huge arena, dating from 80 AD, Christians, gladiators and beasts fought and died in front of crowds of up to 60,000.

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Judaism: The Tree of Life of the Jewish Kabbalah Art Print

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Judaism: The Tree of Life of the Jewish Caballa Art Print

Kabbalah

Kabbalah is a discipline and school of thought concerned with the mystical aspect of Rabbinic Judaism. It is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an eternal and mysterious Creator and the mortal and finite universe (His creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a denomination in and of itself; it is a set of scriptures that exist outside the traditional Jewish Scriptures.

Kabbalah seeks to define the nature of the universe and the human being, the nature and purpose of existence, and various other ontological questions. It also presents methods to aid understanding of these concepts and to thereby attain spiritual realization. Kabbalah originally developed entirely within the realm of Jewish thought and constantly uses classical Jewish sources to explain and demonstrate its esoteric teachings. These teachings are thus held by kabbalists to define the inner meaning of both the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and traditional rabbinic literature, as well as to explain the significance of Jewish religious observances.

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Vintage Cars: Ferrari Barchetta Roadster

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Vintage Cars: Ferrari Barchetta Roadster

classic car posters, decorative art, ferrari barchetta roadster, ferrari posters, vintage art, vintage car posters

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