Digital Poduction Techniques in Visual Media

Digital Art: Woman in Cowboy Hat Dancing

The techniques of digital art are used extensively by the mainstream media in advertisements, and by film-makers to produce special effects. Desktop publishing has had a huge impact on the publishing world, although that is more related to graphic design. It is possible that general acceptance of the value of digital art will progress in much the same way as the increased acceptance of electronically produced music over the last three decades.

Digital art can be purely computer-generated (such as fractals and algorithmic art) or taken from other sources, such as a scanned photograph or an image drawn using vector graphics software using a mouse or graphics tablet.

Though technically the term may be applied to art done using other media or processes and merely scanned in, it is usually reserved for art that has been non-trivially modified by a computing process (such as a computer program, microcontroller or any electronic system capable of interpreting an input to create an output); digitized text data and raw audio and video recordings are not usually considered digital art in themselves, but can be part of the larger project of computer art and information art.

Artworks are considered digital painting when created in similar fashion to non-digital paintings but using software on a computer platform and digitally outputting the resulting image as painted on canvas.

Andy Warhol created digital art with the help of Amiga, Inc. in July 1985 when he publicly introduction at Lincoln Center Amiga paint software.

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Luis Royo and His Fantastic Art

Evolution by Luis Royo

Luis Royo was born in 1954 in Olalla, a small town near Teruel, Spain. When he was young, he moved with his family in Zaragoza, where he goes to school for the first time, and where his first drawing reminders returned to him. In these reminders, he sits under the large windows of the school, then pick…

His practical side, which he received from his family, led him to study the technical drawing. He discovers very quickly that the geometric forms do not entirely satisfy. He began to study painting, decoration and interior design school “industrial” and “worker arts school, and combine this with various works in design and interior design studios, between 1970 and 1971.

In the meantime, it combines its operations with the paint. Biased in May 1968, he paints large format paintings with social themes, which he shows in the exhibitions in 1972 and 1976, followed by a series of exhibitions in 1977.

When he discovered comics for adults, artist Enki Bilal and Moebius in 1978, Luis Royo began drawing comics for different fanzines and show them at the Festival “BD Angouleme in 1980.

Alone by Luis Royo

In 1979, he left out his work in design studios, to devote entirely to comics. In 1981 and 1982, his work was published as “Comix International”, the “Rambla”, and sometimes in the Vibora “El” and “Heavy Metal”.

In 1983, a meeting with Rafael Martínez, in the festival “Zaragoza Comics” will determine his future career. It is controlled by the product MARTINEZ five digits for Editorial Norma, marking the beginning of a new born professional cooperation between them.

His work is not confined within the national territory, it is also published in foreign media. His work is also published in the United States, the United Kingdom. and Sweden, where he covers for publishers glamorous as “Tor Books,” Berkley “,” Avon “,” Warner “,” Batman “, and others!

American magazines like “Heavy Metal” and “National Lampoon” asked Luis Royo covers a little more. Also ask whether European magazines such as “Cimoc”, “Comic Art”, “compresses Era”, “Total Metal”, and others. Nevertheless, his work is not reserved for magazine covers, he is also asked to make covers for videos and video games.

Luis Royo Biography

In 1985, alongside his work as an illustrator, he published a cartoon in the “Rambla” series and a year later, in “Ediciones Ikusager SA”, he publishes a comic called “DESFASE.

In 1990, when established in a privileged position on the international market of the figure, it improves the amount of his own worh, as opposed to commissioned works. The large amount of his work is bought by different media or included in compilations.

In 1992, thanks to a proposal made some years earlier by the man who discovered it, he published his first compilation work: “Women”, an album together all his best work so far. With this compilation, it is already identified as a great illustrator and his penchant for attracting women began to emerge clearly. It was a wonderful book for lovers of comics, covering a wide range of series, which were published by “Sun Editorial” France and “Ediciones Comic Forum in Germany. Based on this compilation, he made his first exhibition of original illustrations.

A year later, his paintings make a collection of comic cards using his characters, known as “fantasy to reality.”

After the success of its first compilation in 1994 “MALEFIC” is published with the most numbers of Luis Royo, establishing a large number of worlds and colors. In “MALEFIC, the illustrator set is named – An illustrator not only able to portray future worlds of imagination, but also to create a history and a form around the personality that gives the book title.

In the same year, “women” should be published, and the United States, “Penthouse” write an article on his figures.

In 1995, new publishers are beginning to be interested in Luis Royo works: “Ballantine”, “Naw”, “Daw” Doubleday “,” Harper Paperbacks, “” Zebra “,” Fasa Corporation “,” Pocket Books “( Star Trek series), Penthouse Comix “and” Fller Ulta X-Men for Marvel. Since that year, the works of Luis Royo is published in multiple formats and in many countries: calendars, posters, T-shirts , CD jackets, mouse pads, trading cards in collaboration with other artists, as in “The Art of heavy metal” or individually, as in “THE BEST OF ROYO”.

The imagination and quality of Luis Royo begin to take place in any type of media, and his name is becoming well known. In 1996, he made a resumption of “Penthouse” in the United States and Germany. The same year, numerous reports on its work are published. He also received the Silver Award SPECTRUM III “, the Best of the fantastic contemporary United States.

After the success of “MALEFIC,” his third album, “Secrets”, was published in 1996, showing women and magic in the central role, and the presence of basic beauty and the beast. This work is published by NBM for English-speaking countries. But he surprised his fans in the same year, with the brochure “hot winds”, published by Norma Editorial “in cooperation with” Heavy Metal “.

In 1997, the emphasis placed by Luis Royo Heavy Metal is shown in a large quantity of blankets and calendars, and also in her gallery, which is entirely dedicated to Royo. The outcome of interest to a committee for the coverage of the twentieth anniversary edition of the journal, and a series of numbers on the character of FAAK (Julie Strain) by Kevin Eastman.

In the same year, two new collections of collectible cards are issued: “ROYO SECRET desires” and “artistic choice” (in common with other artists). Finally, “women” and “MALEFIC” are published in the United States U.S. and one is re-published in Spain.

A year later, his book is published next figure: “III Millennium”. In this book, Royo replaces his palette of colors and gives us his own particular vision of the end of the century. In addition, in 1998, he presented his collection of Tarot cards, the “BLACK TAROT”. In 1999, he produced the calendar Heavy Metal and his fifth collection of cards under the name “III Millennium”. It was a year where Luis Royo has shown a clear evolution models bold figures.

To fit in with the Barcelona Comic Fair “in 1999, an exhibition Royo new album” Dreams “- a compilation of all figures commissioned for his last ten years. What is striking about this album is the versatility of the artist to adapt to different subjects and styles.

The artist gives us, at the end of the year, a more daring and honest than ever: the first volume of “forbidden books”, with surprising erotic content in which the tale of “Beauty and the Beast has a major importance. This deluxe edition, smaller than previous albums, we offer images as sensual as ever. “EVOLUTION” remind us of the great album format containing more personal works. The choice of figures clock’s are marked by hand, time and science fiction, and are described with the presence of any women that were expressions become more confident and dominant. This album is accompanied by a study of personality of “MALEFIC.

Initially conceived as a trilogy, “prohibits BOOK II” was published in 2001 – A book in which sensations are transferred to the reader by the force of the characters. continuity in the first volume, he offers a different vision of sensuality, closer to the dreams and secret desires, prohibited.

Increasingly focused on his own work, his best female characters are played by “Fournier” poker cards pack.

In 2002, Luis Royo presents some of his secrets in “ideas” – a book that describes the process of creation and also presents a collection of images of the artist and trends which enables us to appreciate the study of personality, illustrations and design solutions that replace many Royo considers before making his final work.

“VISIOS” was published in 2003. It is a compilation by Kevin Eastman, creator of “ninja turtles”, in which images are dominated by Luis Royo skills and imagination. It develops new details and a wide range of colors, including dragons who occupy a privileged position with a woman.

“Forbidden Book III” is the latest of the “forbidden books”. In this volume, readers are confined in the beauty, tenderness and the desire of the images. – Pictures of the sensuality that can be regarded as monstrous .

Fall 2003, the artist opened his work with a series of numbers and projects for the illustrations in his compilation books, accompanied by texts in order to improve the reader experience. With “designs II, it goes further than the first volume, presenting models of colors to be contrasted with the projects pencil.

“Fantastic Art” is the largest compilation so far. Published in May 2004, he assembled the most complete collection of illustrations of the artist. Released in two formats for high quality, luxury limited edition is a good example of the importance of the compilation. Imagination and reality met in the images, which were exhibits Royo own particular point of view of the world, myths, legends that have shaped it. It is a vision of reality in the future must assume its own challenges.

Luis Royo moved to Barcelona where he found a very nice place, the Gothic Quarter, where he creates his works. This change of residence means a change in the way it works in the vision of his work and the desire to return to painting.

“Forbidden Sketchbook” is the last published work by the artist. In it, we can appreciate the sensuality and the desire of the colorless PROHIBITED “book” in its earlier stages. It includes the original projects in which one has the power of images is already evident. Like a charm, it includes projects that challenge with their incredible strength doensn’t appear in previous publications. In his last period, in combination with other works, Luis Royo has spent four years on the development of a more personal work – “THE LABYRINTH:” Tarot. This production of Tarot cards See-no-limit perfectionnism of the artist. This is a package in which each image has been carefully and meticulously studied and shows a titanic level of documentation.

“THE LABYRINTH: TAROT” is the first completely new work by Luis Royo, where no image has already been published. It is published in December 2004 in two formats: an exclusive pack of cards and a book containing all the photos and text explaining, written by the artist himself, explaning the hidden meaning of each card and their power to control destiny of a person. Because he began working as an illustrator, many Heavy Metal bands from different countries (eg Germany, Italy, Spain ,…) adopted the images of Luis Royo, using them for their CD jackets. Between these two works, the most recent was devoted to two CDs of the Austrian group “Avalanch”.

We’ve clearly spoken by one of the most popular worldwide and professional illustrator, whose glory – instead of him ourtun – lead to a permanent process of finding new challenges or proposals, knows colors , textures and find new forms of expression outside the picture itself. He is a worker who untirable fans worldwide, with a magical vision of the imagination of all who surround experience, evolution, and JUSTIFICAT its privileged position on the international market for illustration.

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College Humor – Jesus Joined the Faithbook


College Humor - Jesus Joined the Faithbook

campus ministry, college culture, college posters, faithbook, jesus faith, praise and worship, religion and sprituality

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Fantasy Illustration: Victoria Frances and Vampire Girl’s Kiss

Fantasy Illustration: Victoria Frances and Vampire Girl's Kiss

Victoria Francés (born October 25, 1982) is a Spanish illustrator.

Victoria Francés was born in Valencia on October 25, 1982, though she spent part of her childhood in Galicia. Later on, she returned to her hometown to earn her degree from the San Carlos School of Fine Arts, at the Polytechnic University of Valencia.

The first volume of the FAVOLE trilogy (Norma Editorial, 2004) was her first illustrated work to be published. Manifested throughout the entirety of the Favole trilogy (2004-2007) are themes emerging from Dark Romanticism, highly influenced by both the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and well known works of Gothic art. Her work received a number of awards and achieved great success in countries where it was published.

Consequently, the American publishing house Dark Horse became interested in her work, and Francés has since then been published in North America, thus allowing her to increase her fan base. She made herself known at the XXII Barcelona Comic Convention, where she made her first public appearance and earned the respect of renowned authors. Calendars featuring her artwork, as well as other promotional merchandise such as posters, puzzles, tarot cards and stationery products have been made available to the public for purchase.

Victoria Frances

Despite the current effervescent nature of the Gothic movement, Victoria decided to experiment with different themes, and in 2007 the course of her artistic career took another direction with the publication of ARLENE’S HEART (El Corazón de Arlene) by Planeta DeAgostini. Within the pages of this book, the author mixes dreams with social reality.

In 2009, she reveals yet another change in her artistic register with the publication of the first volume in her MISTY CIRCUS series (Norma Editorial), an original collection of books based on the decadent world of the travelling circus, written especially for a younger audience. Near the end of that same year, DARK SANCTUARY was also published (Astiberri Ediciones), written in collaboration with Dark Sanctuary, a “Dark Atmospheric” band from France. The project, a fusion between music and illustration, aimed to reflect the poignant beauty of the shadows.

The second volume in the MISTY CIRCUS series is entitled THE NIGHT OF THE WITCHES (La Noche de las Brujas), published by Norma Editorial in 2010. The continuation of the story takes place on the night of Samhain, an ancestral celebration in the pagan culture.

In 2011, the Favole trilogy was re-edited in order to create one single volume entitled INTEGRAL FAVOLE (Norma Editorial), a compilation of the three books in addition to unpublished sketches and illustrations specially included in this edition. A year later, in 2012, OCEAN LAMENT (El Lamento del Océano) was published, in which the author features a listless, spectral mermaid as the main protagonist.

While working on her upcoming books, Victoria Francés was also busy creating individual licensed images for her merchandise, undertaking commissioned work and collaborating with other artists through various illustrations. One of the most noteworthy of these collaborative projects was the illustration “Hekate” which was specially made for the album entitled “Luna” for the German Pagan Folk band, Faun, and the full artwork for a new cd project entitled “Naked Harp” of the Pagan Folk band, Omnia.

At the end of 2014, Victoria presented her new project called MANDRAKMOORS, in collaboration with the South Korean bjd doll company, Fairyland. For this project, the author set out to combine both the work of new character design, specifically of characters related to the world of witchcraft and pagan traditions, with the subsequent creation of bjd dolls, in partnership with FairyLand.

Victoria Francés is currently completing her first piece for MANDRAKMOORS. The protagonist is Sionna Fómhar, the first character and bjd doll in the MandrakMoors universe. This work is scheduled to be released at the end of 2015.

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Artist and Mystic Experience

Artist and Mystic Experience

Now these are precisely the points of view which the teacher of religion also is constantly seeking to induce. He too calls people from their pursuits and practical ambitions to enjoy the communions of the spirit. He also summons men to leave off for a moment their doing that they may devote themselves to seeing. He also is persuaded of the inadequacy of mere thinking, claiming the possibility of a more nearly immediate experience of reality.

If this is anything like the truth, it is a strange thing that the professional schools for priests and prophets abundantly supply instruction that is intellectual and moral while very meagerly offering any tutelage of the imagination or any instruction in the discipline and development of the emotional career or in the technique whereby the minister of religion may become a proficient master in these areas. This will one day be changed so that every trained leader of religion will be more aware of the universal hunger for beauty and more capable of utilizing this almost unlimited asset for the religious ends of his task.

We are accustomed to thinking that the world of religion is willing to recognize this kinship with the world of the arts more readily than is the critic of the arts. The contrary is true. One is more likely to find the language of religion in the writings of the art world than to discover an equal intelligence amongst religious writers concerning the critique of the arts. When Bernard Bosanquet says that “the mind of man has its own necessity, which weaves its great patterns on the face of the whole world. And in these patterns–the pattern of life itself–the fullest feeling finds embodiment,” he is discussing the impulse and the necessity of the artist toward the same experience as the mystic.

Artist and Mystic Experience

William Temple in discussing some of the noblest works of art, writes: “In the presence of such transcendent Beauty, we realize the hope of mysticism. In a single impression we receive what absolutely satisfies us, and in that perfect satisfaction we ourselves are lost. Duration vanishes; the Now these are precisely the points of view which the teacher of religion also is constantly seeking to induce. He too calls people from their pursuits and practical ambitions to enjoy the communions of the spirit. He also summons men to leave off for a moment their doing that they may devote themselves to seeing. He also is persuaded of the inadequacy of mere thinking, claiming the possibility of a more nearly immediate experience of reality.

If this is anything like the truth, it is a strange thing that the professional schools for priests and prophets abundantly supply instruction that is intellectual and moral while very meagerly offering any tutelage of the imagination or any instruction in the discipline and development of the emotional career or in the technique whereby the minister of religion may become a proficient master in these areas. This will one day be changed so that every trained leader of religion will be more aware of the universal hunger for beauty and more capable of utilizing this almost unlimited asset for the religious ends of his task.

We are accustomed to thinking that the world of religion is willing to recognize this kinship with the world of the arts more readily than is the critic of the arts. The contrary is true. One is more likely to find the language of religion in the writings of the art world than to discover an equal intelligence amongst religious writers concerning the critique of the arts. When Bernard Bosanquet says that “the mind of man has its own necessity, which weaves its great patterns on the face of the whole world. And in these patterns–the pattern of life itself–the fullest feeling finds embodiment,” he is discussing the impulse and the necessity of the artist toward the same experience as the mystic.

William Temple in discussing some of the noblest works of art, writes: “In the presence of such transcendent Beauty, we realize the hope of mysticism. In a single impression we receive what absolutely satisfies us, and in that perfect satisfaction we ourselves are lost. Duration vanishes; the’moment eternal’ is come. The great drama proceeds; the music surges through us; we are not conscious of our own existence. We hear and see; and when all is done, we consider and bow the head.”S * He is writing as an art critic but in the language of religion. Again in discussing one of the lectures of Mr. Arthur Balfour, he writes: “The past and the future vanish; space itself is forgotten: whether or not mysticism is, as Mr. Balfour fears, the only possible philosophy of art, it is beyond question that the aesthetic experience is a purely mystical experience; that is to say, it is the direct and immediate apprehension of an absolutely satisfying object.”

I have somewhere read in a writing of Archdeacon Freemantle, the following: “Art becomes a binding link between men and draws them together toward God. It forms a society which must properly be called a Church. Its yearning toward the ideal is worship, a prayer. The sharing in artistic impressions is a genuine form of worship. It is destined to occupy no mean place in the full redemption of human life.”

The religious feelings relate to life as a whole. They are the response of man to the presently realized existence of divinity. They reach out to grasp the Universal and the Absolute. The feeling for beauty is usually not universal. But it is a feeling for being, for that which has existence. Every work of art says, Notice this fact, this bit of life: be a lover of life as you see it here. Religion says, Be a lover of Life as a Whole, God’s Life, love God. There is a profound identity of attitude between these two.

Religion is not merely thinking and feeling, it is also right doing. The moral issues of religion are ever the concern of healthy human life. We will have nothing to do with a religion which is ineffective in the practical world or weak in its increasing enthusiasm for a thoroughgoing application of its ideals to every phase of life, industrial and political as well as personal. These are the vast problems of the hour. We shall have no future religion at all if they are not manfully and courageously handled.

It is too commonly assumed that at this point the arts must part company with religion. Many have felt that to be interested in Beauty while the world is suffering from inhumanity is an ignoble thing. Unfortunately, both the conduct of artists in general and many critics of the arts have tended to foster such a view. Mr. Merton Stark Yewdale sets forth a correct note on the expressive desire of the aesthetic experience and then completely spoils the picture by separating that experience from practical life.

“We have a sensation of an enhanced power, a compelling desire to rid ourselves of a certain state of tension, eagerness to reciprocate the force which the artist exerts toward us.”So far so good. Then something extremely bad: “As our faculties are again assembled we see once more that life is the great delusion and Art the supreme counter-agent to existence.”

How could anyone write that who had ever read Emerson’s “Compensation”? There are in fact no real barriers between the world of Art Life and the world of Common Life. The artist marks off a bit of the world and harmonizes it and sees that it is good or beautiful. Religion rises to see that all creation is good. It will admit no barriers. It would glorify all life.

The very nature of artistry is activity. Works of art are described as creations. Whatever may be said about the appreciation of Beauty, art is the production of Beauty. Artistry is expression, release, liberation, outgoing effort, authorship, origination. Its results are not called thoughts of art or feelings of art but works of art.

And the artist not only creates new forms of material beauty but also new persons. The very essence of the thing that happens to people when they are impressed by beauty, either of nature or of art, is increased vitality. They are literally remade, increased in strength of body and strength of mind.

Still a third practical effect of the artist’s work is the result in the world of the enhanced power developed in the aesthetic experience. This is the point least clearly intimated by writers on the subject, and denied by many. It is the point of disagreement with Mr. Yewdale. Even Professor Hocking in his profound discussion of art and religion in the volume, “Human Nature and Its Remaking,” does not sufficiently get away from his suggestion that the world of art is an arena in which man may make his conquests more easily than in the world of fact.

“Art is the region which man has created for himself, wherein he can find scope for unexpressed powers, and yet win an absolute success, in testimony of his own reality… It has but feeble contact with the more pressing problems of the ‘common man.’ It fits no one for dealing with the as yet unharmonized aspects of experience. Its tendency would be to seclude itself, build for itself high garden walls, and in the midst of a world small enough to be perfectly controlled, forget the ugly, the squalid, the disordered, the just causes for warfare and rebellion.”

There are undoubtedly many facts which bear out this view. And with the facts coincides the oft-repeated description of the experience of beauty as being a feeling of power coupled with the paradoxical feeling of repose, a sense of great energy but of no demand to exercise it. The aesthetic moment is by everyone described as the moment of perfect satisfaction.

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The Sensational Character of Art

The Sensational Character of Art

The first force of a work of art is its appeal to the senses. This is direct and immediate. It is the physical effect, almost utterly unescapable whenever there is presented to anyone a vigorous composition in color or in tone or a strong rhythm of song or of motion.

Religion which has disdained the arts as sensuous has not, therefore, escaped sensationalism. It has developed the sensational preacher. He is the man who preaches for a sensuous effect. He has greater success usually in getting people to come to hear what he has to say than in having something worth while to say when they get there. This is not always true but it is so very commonly. Our most thoughtful ministers, those under whose preaching the more serious-minded people desire to sit, are little given to sensational preaching.

Their form is good form but it is not nowadays florid, overly dramatic, or eccentric form. They touch upon timely themes of the day, not as advertising captions but for real discussion. Your true and proper sensationalist develops rhetoric, gesture, perhaps even hair cuts, newspaper themes, and peculiar exercises calculated to rouse interest and produce a momentary enjoyment or excitement.

Sensationalism is necessary for religion, but not this kind. I would rather that my boys should be appealed to by the noble sensationalism of excellent paintings, brilliant music, and noble ritual than by the sensationalism of an evangelist crawling about on all fours like a bear show.

The Sensational Character of Art

However much we may desire to spiritualize our religion, we are not disembodied spirits, we are compact together of flesh and spirit– “Nor soul helps flesh more now, than flesh helps soul.”

Our view of human nature and of the bodily life is very different from that of the Reformation theology. Our new utilization of the fine arts is to be based upon the new psychology and upon the new theology rather than upon Calvinism.

The impulses of the flesh may develop downward. But also every human instinct may become the root of a possible spiritual virtue. If our task is still partly to mortify the flesh, it is also to understand it and use it for good. If spirtual experience is an incorporeal thing, its beginning is usually something born in the mystery of the bodily being. We do not have the same reasons for fearing the arts that the Puritan had, as he did not have our reasons for using them.

Sensationalism has always been deep and constant in human life and in religion and always will be during the life of earth. The Hebrew prophets not only used abundant imagery in speech but actual physical objects and eccentricities of conduct to capture attention and press home their message. It seems questionable whether Jesus performed his works of healing for this purpose, but hardly questionable that his approach to the city on the Day of Palms was a form of sensational appeal. It may be said of it, as it may be said of other sensational conduct, that it was done for effect. Precisely so, for that is the way to be effective.

Our modern church has rather too little than too much of appeal to the senses. It is not sufficiently interesting or sufficiently thrilling. I do not at all object to the sensational methods of the orator or of the evangelist in their proper place. But the sensational preacher should not be the pastor and teacher of a normal church, large or small. That form of appeal to the senses is in the long run neither so effective nor so beneficial as quieter forms–music, decoration, architecture, and liturgy. The oratorical type may be more thrilling at the moment but less lasting than the rhythms set going by the finer arts.

The older religions all make more effective use of the noble and more commendable forms of appeal to the senses. One would not expect to get the following testimony from a modern free churchman, but here it is: “The Japanese know how to produce effects, they have a sure instinct as to the moods in which a person should stand before a temple or shrine. Hence they study the approaches to their sacred spots almost as much as they do the elaboration of the spots themselves. The Shintoists have their torii or more likely lines of torii before each shrine; the Buddhists love to place their houses of worship and meditation in the midst of great trees or on the tops of hills which they approach by moss-covered staircases of stone…

When one has removed his shoes and penetrated to’ the inner shrine and stands on the soft matted floor before the image of the Great Buddha, the subtle power of idolatry when wedded to high art becomes apparent in an unmistakable way. The sense of solemnity, of quietness, of peace is in the very air, and there comes to one a new sympathy toward those who know only this way of consolation.” These beautiful and skillful arrangements are planned for their direct and immediate effect upon the senses and they are effective.

Nor would one naturally expect the testimony written by one of the most distinguished New England clergymen of the nineteenth century, a leader and representative of the best thought of his day. Dr. Theodore Munger describes the cathedrals and cathedral services of the English Church. And then he adds: “Here lies the secret of public worship; we do not worship because we feel like it, but that we may feel.

The feeling may have died out under the pressure of the world, but coming together from mere habit, and starting on the level of mere custom, we soon feel the stirring of the wings of devotion, and begin to rise heavenward on the pinnacles of song and prayer. This is well understood in England, and underlies the much criticised ‘Cathedral system.’ Here is a mighty fact tremendously asserted; it forces a sort of inevitable reverence, not the highest and purest indeed, but something worth having. It becomes the conservator of the faith, and in the only way in which it can be conserved, through the reverent sentiment and poetry of our nature… The main value of the established church is its lofty and unshaken assertion of the worth of worship–keeping alive reverence, which is the mother of morality, and furnishing a public environment for the common faith.

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Introducing American Cowgirl


Introducing American Cowgirl

born and bred poster, cowgirl posters, decorative art, Giclee Prints, Illustration Art, vintage art, vintage art posters, World Cultures

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Renoir Art: Two Sisters on the Terrace, 1881

Renoir Art: Two Sisters an the Terrace, 1881

Two Sisters or On the Terrace is an 1881 oil-on-canvas painting by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The dimensions of the painting are 100.5 cm × 81 cm. The title Two Sisters (French: Les Deux Sœurs) was given to the painting by Renoir, and the title On the Terrace (French: Sur la terrasse) by its first owner Paul Durand-Ruel.

Renoir worked on the painting on the terrace of the Maison Fournaise, a restaurant located on an island in the Seine in Chatou, the western suburb of Paris. The painting depicts a young woman and her younger sister seated outdoors with a small basket containing balls of wool. Over the railings of the terrace one can see shrubbery and foliage with the River Seine behind it.

In 1880 to 1881, shortly before working on Two Sisters, Renoir worked in this particular location on another well-known painting, Luncheon of the Boating Party.

Jeanne Darlot (1863—1914), a future actress who was 18 years old at the time, was posing as “the elder sister.” It is unknown who posed as the “younger sister,” but it is stated that the models were not actually related.

Renoir began work on the painting in April 1881 and on July 7, 1881, it was bought by the art dealer, Paul Durand-Ruel, for 1,500 francs. The painting was presented for the first time to the public at the 7th Impressionist exhibition in the spring of 1882. In 1883 it was known to be in the collection of Charles Ephrussi, an art collector and a publisher, but in 1892 the painting was returned again to the collection of the Durand-Ruel family.

In 1925, the painting was sold to Annie S. Coburn from Chicago for $100,000. After her death in 1932 the painting was bequeathed to the Art Institute of Chicago, where it has remained since 1933.

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Francisco Goya: The Father of Modern Art

Execution of the Defenders of Madrid, 3rd May, 1808, 1814

Francisco Goya, considered to be “the Father of Modern Art,” began his painting career just after the late Baroque period. In expressing his thoughts and feelings frankly, as he did, he became the pioneer of new artistic tendencies which were to come to fruition in the 19th century. Two trends dominated the art of his contradictory; they actually were not. Together they represented the reaction against previous conceptions of art and the desire for a new form of expression.

In order to understand the scope of Goya’s art, and to appreciate the principles which governed his development and tremendous versatility, it is essential to realise that his work extended over a period of more than 60 years, for he continued to draw and paint until his 82nd year.

The importance of this factor is evident between his attitude towards life in his youth, when he accepted the world as it was quite happily, in his manhood when he began to criticise it, and in his old age when he became embittered and disillusioned with people and society. Furthermore, the world changed completely during his lifetime. The society, in which he had achieved a great success disappeared during the Napoleonic war. Long before the end of the 18th century Goya had already turned towards his new ideals and expressed them in his graphic art and in his paintings.

As an artist, Goya was by temperament far removed from the classicals. In a few works he approached Classical style, but in the greater part of his work the Romantic triumphed.

Born in Zaragoza, Spain, he found employment as a young teenager under the mediocre artist José Luzán, from whom he learned to draw and as was customary, copied prints of several masters.

At the age of 17 he went to Madrid. His style was influenced by two painters who were working there. The last of the great Venetian painters—Tiepolo and the rather cold and efficient neo-classical painter—Antonio Raphael Mengs. In 1763 he entered a competition at the Royal Academy of San Fernando, and failed, as he did in the year 1766. In 1770, he want to Rome and survived by living off his works of art.

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Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

Home decor gets a dash of drama with movie posters. The trick is in picking the right one for the right space and customizing it for the interiors.

The fancy for movie posters as a statement of style in home decor is a relatively recent trend. In the home interiors segment, in which art continues to top customer wish-lists, movie posters are still considered niche territory. But there’s probably nothing more gratifying for the incorrigible movie fan — there’s a bit of him in all of us, anyway — than having the walls around mounted with posters of favourite films.

Wall Decoration and Movie Themes

Arriving at a theme for the rooms — from romance, mystery and such — can be a start to wall decoration. Posters of films that coincide with real-life phases can add that personal bit to the decor. You can also mix the movie posters up as a sequence — James Bond from different ages, for instance — or fix them together in a collage. All, needless to say, in tune with the basics of wall decoration and colour schemes of the room.

Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

Classic Movie Posters

Posters of classic movies are eternal favourites, a testimony reflected in the rise in the number of online groups selling them. Casablanca, Gone With The Wind and Alfred Hitchcock thrillers continue to be good draws in the classic movie posters segment but you are doing up your place and it’s your pick that counts.

So the gangster genre fan in you can go for the classic split-on Scarface poster and the rom-com lovers have the now-legendary Pretty Woman poster. Again, the range is all out there and it’s for you to make the choice. Though the idea works on personalization, classic movie posters look better in the living room and it helps to innovate while picking and arranging the line-up of posters.

Presenting Movie Posters For Interiors

Vintage posters come with the advantage of never having to look “old” but it doesn’t work with all movie posters. That’s reason enough to focus more on ways to present them to accentuate the home’s interiors. The old, trusted wooden frames bring a certain elegance to the posters as you mount them on the walls. But it’s again important to customize; The Matrix wouldn’t look good in one, would it?

Wall decoration of the personal home theatre with movie posters can, in an understated way, enrich your movie-watching experience. The fancied back-lit poster box is still the best option in mounting movie posters, especially in home theatres. For the regular mounts, there are many available sizes — 24×36 and 20×20 among popular dimensions — to be picked according to the clarity of the image and the available wall space.

Identifying the right poster for the right space is critical. Quirks apart, it always makes sense to avoid The Fist Of Fury in the study and, the horror of horrors, Psycho in the bath.

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