Tag: buddhism posters

Vishnu: The Supreme God in the Hinduism

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Vishnu: The Supreme God in the Hinduism

Vishnu is the Supreme God in the Vaishnavite tradition of Hinduism. Smarta followers of Adi Shankara, among others, venerate Vishnu as one of the five primary forms of God.

The Vishnu Sahasranama declares Vishnu as Paramatma (supreme soul) and Parameshwara (supreme God). It describes Vishnu as the All-Pervading essence of all beings, the master of—and beyond—the past, present and future, the creator and destroyer of all existences, one who supports, sustains and governs the Universe and originates and develops all elements within. Vishnu governs the aspect of preservation and sustenance of the universe, so he is called ‘Preserver of the universe’.

In the Puranas, Vishnu is described as having the divine colour of water filled clouds, four-armed, holding a lotus, mace, conch (shankha) and chakra (wheel). Vishnu is also described in the Bhagavad Gita as having a ‘Universal Form’ (Vishvarupa) which is beyond the ordinary limits of human perception or imagination.

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Samadhi: Non-Dualistic State of Consciousness in Buddhism

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Samadhi: Non-Dualistic State of Consciousness in Buddhism

Samadhi in Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and yogic schools is a higher level of concentrated meditation, or dhyāna. In the yoga tradition, it is the eighth and final limb identified in the Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali.

It has been described as a non-dualistic state of consciousness in which the consciousness of the experiencing subject becomes one with the experienced object, and in which the mind becomes still, one-pointed or concentrated though the person remains conscious. In Buddhism, it can also refer to an abiding in which mind becomes very still but does not merge with the object of attention, and is thus able to observe and gain insight into the changing flow of experience.

In Hinduism, samādhi can also refer to videha mukti or the complete absorption of the individual consciousness in the self at the time of death – usually referred to as mahasamādhi.

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The Tibetian Wheel of Life

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The Tibetian Wheel of Life

The Wheel of Life symbolizes the Tibetan Buddhist perspective on life and it contains many themes and symbols of Buddhist teachings.

The creature turns the wheel of life and it holds in its claws is Yama, a wrathful deity and the Lord of Death. Yama symbolizes the inevitability of death, samsara and the impermanence of all things. This does not lead to despair, however, because outside of the wheel is the Buddha, who shows the way to liberation (symbolized by the moon).

The inner circle of the wheel contains symbols of the three root delusions: hatred (snake), ignorance (rooster), and greed (pork).

The ring around the center is the karma, with the numbers on the left to climb to more realms of existence because of virtuous actions, and the numbers on the right descending to the lower realms of existence because of bad deeds or ignorant.

The central ring of the wheel (the areas between the spokes) symbolizes the six realms of existence. The upper half, left to right, represent the three highest spheres of life: humans, gods and demigods. The bottom half shows the three lower realms of existence: animals, hell beings and hungry ghosts.

The outer ring represents the 12 original dependent relationship, as follows:

Right next to the upper part is a blind man with his cane, which is ignorance of the true nature of the world.

Moving clockwise, a potter molding a pot symbolizes that we shape our own destiny with our actions throughout the operation of karma.

Monkey climbing a tree represents consciousness or mind, which wanders aimlessly and out of control.

Consciousness gives rise to name and form, which is symbolized by persons traveling in a boat on the river of life.

The next link is an empty house, doors and windows that symbolize the sense organs in development. Buddha has six senses: sight, smell, taste, hearing, touch and thought.

The six senses allow us to have contact with the world, which is symbolized by lovers embracing.

Contact born of feeling, which we classify as pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. Feelings are represented on the wheel like an arrow piercing the eye.

Feeling born of desire or attachment to pleasant feelings and experiences, symbolized by a couple falling in love or drinking man.

Desire or attachment leads to grasp for an object of desire, symbolized by a monkey picking fruit.

Capture the existence arises, represented by a man and woman making love.

Existence culminates in the birth (entry into the human realm), which is symbolized by a woman in childbirth.

Birth naturally leads to aging and death, which is symbolized by an old man carrying a burden.

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The Hand of Buddha Art Print

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The Hand of Buddha Art Print

the hand of buddha, buddha posters, buddhism posters, religion and spirituality, asian cultures, world cultures, asian influence

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