Tag: Canvas Art

All About Lunch Atop a Skyscraper Photo

Share this artwork:

All About Lunch Atop a Skyscraper Photo

Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam) is a famous black-and-white photograph taken during construction of the RCA Building at 30 Rockefeller Center in Manhattan, New York City, United States.

The photograph depicts eleven men eating lunch, seated on a girder with their feet dangling 256 meters (840 feet) above the New York City streets. The photo was taken on September 20, 1932 on the 69th floor of the RCA Building during the last months of construction. According to archivists, the photo was in fact prearranged. Although the photo shows real construction workers, it is believed that the moment was staged by the Rockefeller Center to promote its new skyscraper. The photo appeared in the Sunday photo supplement of the New York Herald Tribune on October 2. The glass negative is now owned by Corbis who acquired it from the Acme Newspictures archive in 1995.

Formerly attributed to “unknown”, it has been credited to Charles C. Ebbets since 2003 and erroneously to Lewis Hine. The Corbis corporation is now officially returning its status to unknown although sources continue to credit Ebbets.

There have been numerous claims regarding the identities of the men in the image. The movie Men at Lunch traces some of the men to possible Irish origin, but the director plans to do further interviews to follow up among other claims from Swedish relatives. From the left, number three is Joseph Eckner, number four is Michael Breheny, number five is Albin Svensson and number six with the cigarette is Peter Rice, a Mohawk ironworker from Kahnawake, Canada. The first man from the right is Slovak worker Gusti (Gustáv) Popovič from the village of Vyšný Slavkov in the district of Levoča. Gusti was originally a lumberjack and carpenter.

In 1932 he sent his wife Mariška a postcard with this photography on which he wrote: “Don´t you worry, my dear Mariska, as you can see I’m still with bottle. Your Gusti.” He came back to Vyšný Slavkov at the beginning of World war II and became a farmer. By the end of World war II Gusti was killed by a grenade in his village. His and Mariška’s joint grave is in the Vyšný Slavkov cemetery. The third from the right is Joe Curtis. The man sitting fourth from the right is allegedly Irishman Francis Michael Rafferty with his lifelong best friend and fellow Irishman, Stretch Donahue, sitting to his right.

Throughout his time as Manchester United manager, Sir Alex Ferguson used the image as a motivational tool, showing it to all his players when they made the team. Noting that there are eleven men in the picture, Sir Alex said, “What is the greatest thing a team can do? They can sacrifice their life for each other and sometimes when one falls two can save him.”

Tags : , , , ,

Claude Monet and The Water Lilies

Share this artwork:

Claude Monet and The Water Lilies

As soon as they appeared, the Water Lilies of Claude Monet old age, those hymns to light, plant life and water, incurred the displeasure of both the well-wishers and the detractors of Impressionism. The first were baffled by Monet’s new manner; the second were blind to the new depth of vision these works revealed. Misunderstood and neglected for over thirty years, the Water Lilies are at last receiving the recognition they deserve.

Having had the privilege, from childhood up, of seeing and familiarizing myself with them in the setting at Giverny in which they were created (the only setting, let me add, that can do justice to them), it reflects no particular credit on me to say that personally I have never shared that incomprehension. To see the Water Lilies in the garden studio especially built to house them was to see them in natural, harmonious conjunction with radiant summer days spent in the garden at Giverny beside the pond which inspired them. It was a delight which those who experienced it will never forget.

I cannot deny that, for me at least, the spell is irremediably broken in the Musée de l’Orangerie, in that bleak back room which, designed especially for the Water Lilies in 1925, nevertheless baldly reduces them to a mural decoration — and they are ever so much more than that. The way in which they are encased there, in a long horizontal belt around the concave wall, restricts them to the narrow, perfectly extraneous function of emphasizing the ellipsoidal line of the architecture.

Monet himself contributed to this over-modest setting by approving the whole project at the time and by doing his utmost to adapt his panels to it. To break and diversify the even horizontal flow of the paintings around the room, he sprinkled the foreground with willow fronds suggestive of the decorative style of art nouveau, fashionable around 1900. At the same time they introduce a third dimension which strikes an uncalled-for contrast with the sheer vertical plane of the water surface; the latter, with its rich play of light effects, was theme enough in itself.

The setting, then, in which the Water Lilies have been exhibited to the public in part explains both the eclipse they underwent for over a quarter of a century and the keen revival of interest in them caused by the recent revelation of further Water Lilies hitherto hidden from view in the studio at Giverny. The evolution of taste and ideas in the course of the past halfcentury explains the rest.

This evolution, as far as painting is concerned, began with the dissensions that led to the break-up of the impressionist movement in the eighties. While Monet went on, singlemindedly pursuing the subtlest, most elusive effects and variations of light and atmosphere, Pissarro, Renoir, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Gauguin each branched out in different directions. The Neo-Impressionism of Seurat, with which Pissarro threw in his lot in 1886, was both a logical development of Impressionism and a reaction against it. The systematic, scientific application of the principles which Monet discovered and applied by trial and error signified in effect a tacit condemnation of the intuitive, empirical nature of his art.

As for Renoir, after an uneasy interlude in which he toyed with a harshly linear, Ingresque style, he finally reconciled his concern for form with his love of light, fusing both in an inimitable glorification of volume saturated with color. Cézanne, however, always deferring to his “sensations,” gradually exacted from them not an atmospheric so much as a geological revelation of the visible world. After a fling at Neo-Impressionism, whose narrow harness failed to hold him long in check, Van Gogh hit his stride at Arles, throwing off every constraint in a jubilant, preexpressionist exaltation of color and line. But it was the symbolism of Gauguin which worked the most radical transformation of Impressionism. Gauguin sacrificed the visual aspect of things to the expression, in terms of line and color, of the “idea” they engendered in the mind. He rejected outright the whole battery of naturalistic effects calculated to suggest space and light, and adopted flat colors and heavy contour lines.

The upshot of these powerfully diverging currents was Fauvism, which abandoned every semblance of fidelity to outward appearances in favor of a rapturous glorification of color — but color handled more plastically than it was by the slightly later followers of Van Gogh, with their bias toward expressionist distortion. In spite of this reaction, however, Fauvism and Expressionism remained, like Impressionism, essentially dependent on the sensation induced by the object.

This was no longer true of Cubism, which rejected the outer world as it appears to our senses and built up another one out of a select assortment of elements artificially reassembled in the mind. This essentially cerebral art stood at the opposite pole from the essentially sensuous art of Impressionism. No wonder then that the meat of the one was the poison of the other. The rise of Cubism and the era that followed, during which its influence spread and was assimilated, set up a reaction against Impressionism, whose achievement was belittled and whose most characteristic representative, Claude Monet, was disregarded by a whole generation of artists.

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

All About The French Impressionism

Share this artwork:

All About The French Impressionism

Impressionism was a 19th-century art movement that originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s. The name of the style is derived from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which provoked the critic Louis Leroy to coin the term in a satiric review published in the Parisian newspaper Le Charivari.

Characteristics of Impressionist paintings include relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes; open composition; emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time); common, ordinary subject matter; the inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience; and unusual visual angles. The development of Impressionism in the visual arts was soon followed by analogous styles in other media which became known as Impressionist music and Impressionist literature.

The term “Impressionism” can also be used to describe art created in this style, but not during the late 19th century.

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Sunflowers by Vincent Van Gogh

Share this artwork:

Sunflowers by Vincent Van Gogh

Sunflowers (original title, in French: Tournesols) are the subject of two series of still life paintings by the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh.

The earlier series executed in Paris in 1887, depicts the flowers lying on the ground, while the second set executed a year later in Arles shows bouquets of sunflowers in a vase. In the artist’s mind both sets were linked by the name of his friend Paul Gauguin, who acquired two of the Paris versions.

About eight months later Van Gogh hoped to welcome and to impress Gauguin again with Sunflowers, now part of the painted Décoration for the Yellow House that he prepared for the guestroom of his home in Arles, where Gauguin was supposed to stay. After Gauguin’s departure, Van Gogh imagined the two major versions as wings of the Berceuse Triptych, and finally he included them in his Les XX in Bruxelles exhibit

Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Vintage Santa Claus with his Naughty or Nice List Canvas Print

Share this artwork:
Vintage Santa Claus with his Naughty or Nice List wrappedcanvas
Vintage Santa Claus with his Naughty or Nice List by ChristmasCafe
Make custom canvas prints

Vintage Santa Claus with his Naughty or Nice List Canvas Print

Vintage Illustration Holidays; Christmas

Vintage illustration Christmas image featuring Santa checking his naughty or nice list.

Zazzle’s gloss canvas is made from an additive-free cotton-poly blend and features a special ink-receptive coating that protects the printed surface from cracking when stretched. Made with a tight weave ideal for any photography or fine art, our instant-dry gloss canvas produces prints that are fade-resistant for 100+ years.

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Metallic Scooter on Union Jack Wrapped Canvas

Share this artwork:
Metallic Scooter on union jack Wrapped Canvas wrappedcanvas
Metallic Scooter on union jack Wrapped Canvas by Auslandesign
See other Classic Canvas Prints
Metallic Scooter on union jack Wrapped Canvas wrappedcanvas
Metallic Scooter on union jack Wrapped Canvas by Auslandesign
Browse Classic Canvas Prints

Metallic Scooter on Union Jack Wrapped Canvas

retro scooter mod art

Metallic effect Scooter on shredded union jack art.

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Chicago Vintage Travel Prints

Share this artwork:
Vintage Chicago World's Fair 1934 Travel Poster
Vintage Chicago World's Fair 1934 Travel Poster by hizli_art
Look for more office art at zazzle.com
Chicago ~ Vintage Travel Canvas. print
Chicago ~ Vintage Travel Canvas. by VintageVogue
sell your paintings online with Zazzle.

Chicago ~ Vintage Travel Canvas

This vintage poster has been beautifully enhanced and restored to its former brilliance.

vintage travel posters, chicago vintage posters, vintage art prints, vintage travel canvas, canvas art,, decorative art prints, vintage illustrations

Tags : , , , , , ,

Jaguar – Black Panther Wrapped Canvas – 3 Canvases

Share this artwork:
Jaguar - Black Panther Wrapped Canvas - 3 Canvases wrappedcanvas
Jaguar – Black Panther Wrapped Canvas – 3 Canvases by made_in_atlantis
Jaguar – Black Panther Wrapped Canvas – 3 Canvases

Wild Big Cats Images – Roaring Jaguar Artwork
Jaguar Roars Digital Art – Wildlife Computer Designs – Wild Animals Artworks – Fantasy Art – Jaguar – Black Panther Eyes – Jaguar – Black Panther Face Close-Up – Close-up Jaguar – Black Panther Head – – Portrait of Wild Jaguar – Black Panther Pop Art Picture

Premium Canvas (Matte)

Zazzle’s matte canvas is made from an acid-free cotton-poly blend and features a special ink-receptive coating that protects the printed surface from cracking when stretched. Made with a tight weave ideal for any photography or fine art, our instant-dry matte canvas produces prints that are fade-resistant for 100+ years.

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Patriotic Art: Vietnam Reflections

Share this artwork:


Patriotic Art: Vietnam Reflections

vietnam reflections, stretched canvas prints, canvas art, patriotic posters, americana posters, vietnam art prints, educational posters, decorative art prints

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Blue Asian Painting Abstract Poster Print

Share this artwork:
Blue Asian Painting Abstract Poster Print print
Blue Asian Painting Abstract Poster Print by made_in_atlantis
More Asian painting Posters

asian painting, oriental painting, acrylic abstract painting, asian art, oriental art, oriental abstract, asian abstract, abstract art, creative abstract, blue abstract, canvas art, canvas abstract, original abstract, wall decor, contemporary abstract, calligraphy abstract, japan abstract, abstract expressionism, modern art, modern abstract, blue art, creative art

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,