Tag: Contemporary Art

Decoration Tips for Your Cafe

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Tenderness by Renate Holzner

How to decorate with a coffee house cafe theme in your kitchen is easy to learn and implement. If you love all the different types of coffees, or just simply love the feel of your favorite morning stop, you can have a room that is inspired from your passion.

Choosing the colors when you want to know how to decorate with a coffee house cafe theme in your kitchen can be based on what you already have. When decorating with this style, and if you can completely remodel your kitchen, you can choose your favorite. But if you are stuck with what you have, almost any color can be made to fit. The trick is in the accessories and the finishing touches.

The first step, if you are able to, is to get a small table and chair set that sits one to four people. A wrought iron one, with a glass top, that is usually used outside fits well in this style. Throw a couple of comfortable seat cushions on the chairs to make it practical. The only centerpiece that you need is a sugar and creamer tray set in the center. If you want an extra touch of elegance, place a single flower in a bud vase to complete the look.

Next, have a small shelf within easy reach of the sitting area. Place a few favorite poetry books or novels there for morning enjoyment. Don’t forget a place to set your favorite newspaper on.

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Luis Royo and His Fantastic Art

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Evolution by Luis Royo

Luis Royo was born in 1954 in Olalla, a small town near Teruel, Spain. When he was young, he moved with his family in Zaragoza, where he goes to school for the first time, and where his first drawing reminders returned to him. In these reminders, he sits under the large windows of the school, then pick…

His practical side, which he received from his family, led him to study the technical drawing. He discovers very quickly that the geometric forms do not entirely satisfy. He began to study painting, decoration and interior design school “industrial” and “worker arts school, and combine this with various works in design and interior design studios, between 1970 and 1971.

In the meantime, it combines its operations with the paint. Biased in May 1968, he paints large format paintings with social themes, which he shows in the exhibitions in 1972 and 1976, followed by a series of exhibitions in 1977.

When he discovered comics for adults, artist Enki Bilal and Moebius in 1978, Luis Royo began drawing comics for different fanzines and show them at the Festival “BD Angouleme in 1980.

Alone by Luis Royo

In 1979, he left out his work in design studios, to devote entirely to comics. In 1981 and 1982, his work was published as “Comix International”, the “Rambla”, and sometimes in the Vibora “El” and “Heavy Metal”.

In 1983, a meeting with Rafael Martínez, in the festival “Zaragoza Comics” will determine his future career. It is controlled by the product MARTINEZ five digits for Editorial Norma, marking the beginning of a new born professional cooperation between them.

His work is not confined within the national territory, it is also published in foreign media. His work is also published in the United States, the United Kingdom. and Sweden, where he covers for publishers glamorous as “Tor Books,” Berkley “,” Avon “,” Warner “,” Batman “, and others!

American magazines like “Heavy Metal” and “National Lampoon” asked Luis Royo covers a little more. Also ask whether European magazines such as “Cimoc”, “Comic Art”, “compresses Era”, “Total Metal”, and others. Nevertheless, his work is not reserved for magazine covers, he is also asked to make covers for videos and video games.

Luis Royo Biography

In 1985, alongside his work as an illustrator, he published a cartoon in the “Rambla” series and a year later, in “Ediciones Ikusager SA”, he publishes a comic called “DESFASE.

In 1990, when established in a privileged position on the international market of the figure, it improves the amount of his own worh, as opposed to commissioned works. The large amount of his work is bought by different media or included in compilations.

In 1992, thanks to a proposal made some years earlier by the man who discovered it, he published his first compilation work: “Women”, an album together all his best work so far. With this compilation, it is already identified as a great illustrator and his penchant for attracting women began to emerge clearly. It was a wonderful book for lovers of comics, covering a wide range of series, which were published by “Sun Editorial” France and “Ediciones Comic Forum in Germany. Based on this compilation, he made his first exhibition of original illustrations.

A year later, his paintings make a collection of comic cards using his characters, known as “fantasy to reality.”

After the success of its first compilation in 1994 “MALEFIC” is published with the most numbers of Luis Royo, establishing a large number of worlds and colors. In “MALEFIC, the illustrator set is named – An illustrator not only able to portray future worlds of imagination, but also to create a history and a form around the personality that gives the book title.

In the same year, “women” should be published, and the United States, “Penthouse” write an article on his figures.

In 1995, new publishers are beginning to be interested in Luis Royo works: “Ballantine”, “Naw”, “Daw” Doubleday “,” Harper Paperbacks, “” Zebra “,” Fasa Corporation “,” Pocket Books “( Star Trek series), Penthouse Comix “and” Fller Ulta X-Men for Marvel. Since that year, the works of Luis Royo is published in multiple formats and in many countries: calendars, posters, T-shirts , CD jackets, mouse pads, trading cards in collaboration with other artists, as in “The Art of heavy metal” or individually, as in “THE BEST OF ROYO”.

The imagination and quality of Luis Royo begin to take place in any type of media, and his name is becoming well known. In 1996, he made a resumption of “Penthouse” in the United States and Germany. The same year, numerous reports on its work are published. He also received the Silver Award SPECTRUM III “, the Best of the fantastic contemporary United States.

After the success of “MALEFIC,” his third album, “Secrets”, was published in 1996, showing women and magic in the central role, and the presence of basic beauty and the beast. This work is published by NBM for English-speaking countries. But he surprised his fans in the same year, with the brochure “hot winds”, published by Norma Editorial “in cooperation with” Heavy Metal “.

In 1997, the emphasis placed by Luis Royo Heavy Metal is shown in a large quantity of blankets and calendars, and also in her gallery, which is entirely dedicated to Royo. The outcome of interest to a committee for the coverage of the twentieth anniversary edition of the journal, and a series of numbers on the character of FAAK (Julie Strain) by Kevin Eastman.

In the same year, two new collections of collectible cards are issued: “ROYO SECRET desires” and “artistic choice” (in common with other artists). Finally, “women” and “MALEFIC” are published in the United States U.S. and one is re-published in Spain.

A year later, his book is published next figure: “III Millennium”. In this book, Royo replaces his palette of colors and gives us his own particular vision of the end of the century. In addition, in 1998, he presented his collection of Tarot cards, the “BLACK TAROT”. In 1999, he produced the calendar Heavy Metal and his fifth collection of cards under the name “III Millennium”. It was a year where Luis Royo has shown a clear evolution models bold figures.

To fit in with the Barcelona Comic Fair “in 1999, an exhibition Royo new album” Dreams “- a compilation of all figures commissioned for his last ten years. What is striking about this album is the versatility of the artist to adapt to different subjects and styles.

The artist gives us, at the end of the year, a more daring and honest than ever: the first volume of “forbidden books”, with surprising erotic content in which the tale of “Beauty and the Beast has a major importance. This deluxe edition, smaller than previous albums, we offer images as sensual as ever. “EVOLUTION” remind us of the great album format containing more personal works. The choice of figures clock’s are marked by hand, time and science fiction, and are described with the presence of any women that were expressions become more confident and dominant. This album is accompanied by a study of personality of “MALEFIC.

Initially conceived as a trilogy, “prohibits BOOK II” was published in 2001 – A book in which sensations are transferred to the reader by the force of the characters. continuity in the first volume, he offers a different vision of sensuality, closer to the dreams and secret desires, prohibited.

Increasingly focused on his own work, his best female characters are played by “Fournier” poker cards pack.

In 2002, Luis Royo presents some of his secrets in “ideas” – a book that describes the process of creation and also presents a collection of images of the artist and trends which enables us to appreciate the study of personality, illustrations and design solutions that replace many Royo considers before making his final work.

“VISIOS” was published in 2003. It is a compilation by Kevin Eastman, creator of “ninja turtles”, in which images are dominated by Luis Royo skills and imagination. It develops new details and a wide range of colors, including dragons who occupy a privileged position with a woman.

“Forbidden Book III” is the latest of the “forbidden books”. In this volume, readers are confined in the beauty, tenderness and the desire of the images. – Pictures of the sensuality that can be regarded as monstrous .

Fall 2003, the artist opened his work with a series of numbers and projects for the illustrations in his compilation books, accompanied by texts in order to improve the reader experience. With “designs II, it goes further than the first volume, presenting models of colors to be contrasted with the projects pencil.

“Fantastic Art” is the largest compilation so far. Published in May 2004, he assembled the most complete collection of illustrations of the artist. Released in two formats for high quality, luxury limited edition is a good example of the importance of the compilation. Imagination and reality met in the images, which were exhibits Royo own particular point of view of the world, myths, legends that have shaped it. It is a vision of reality in the future must assume its own challenges.

Luis Royo moved to Barcelona where he found a very nice place, the Gothic Quarter, where he creates his works. This change of residence means a change in the way it works in the vision of his work and the desire to return to painting.

“Forbidden Sketchbook” is the last published work by the artist. In it, we can appreciate the sensuality and the desire of the colorless PROHIBITED “book” in its earlier stages. It includes the original projects in which one has the power of images is already evident. Like a charm, it includes projects that challenge with their incredible strength doensn’t appear in previous publications. In his last period, in combination with other works, Luis Royo has spent four years on the development of a more personal work – “THE LABYRINTH:” Tarot. This production of Tarot cards See-no-limit perfectionnism of the artist. This is a package in which each image has been carefully and meticulously studied and shows a titanic level of documentation.

“THE LABYRINTH: TAROT” is the first completely new work by Luis Royo, where no image has already been published. It is published in December 2004 in two formats: an exclusive pack of cards and a book containing all the photos and text explaining, written by the artist himself, explaning the hidden meaning of each card and their power to control destiny of a person. Because he began working as an illustrator, many Heavy Metal bands from different countries (eg Germany, Italy, Spain ,…) adopted the images of Luis Royo, using them for their CD jackets. Between these two works, the most recent was devoted to two CDs of the Austrian group “Avalanch”.

We’ve clearly spoken by one of the most popular worldwide and professional illustrator, whose glory – instead of him ourtun – lead to a permanent process of finding new challenges or proposals, knows colors , textures and find new forms of expression outside the picture itself. He is a worker who untirable fans worldwide, with a magical vision of the imagination of all who surround experience, evolution, and JUSTIFICAT its privileged position on the international market for illustration.

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What Is Contemporary Art?

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What Is Contemporary Art?

Contemporary just means “art that has been and continues to be created during our lifetimes”. In other words, contemporary to us.

Now, of course, if you are 96-years old and reading this (By the way, congratulations, if this describes you. Way to keep up with the times!), you can expect a certain amount of overlapping between “Contemporary” and “Modern” art in your lifetime. A good rule of thumb is:

• Modern Art: Art from the Impressionists (say, around 1880) up until the 1960’s or 70’s.

• Contemporary Art: Art from the 1960’s or 70’s up until this very minute.

Here at About Art History, 1970 is the cut-off point for two reasons. First, because it was around 1970 that the terms “Postmodern” and “Postmodernism” popped up – meaning, we must assume, that the Art World had had its fill of Modern Art starting right then.

Secondly, 1970 seems to be the last bastion of easily classified artistic movements. If you look at the outline of Modern Art, and compare it to the outline of Contemporary Art, you’ll quickly notice that there are far more entries on the former page. This, in spite of the fact that Contemporary Art enjoys far more working artists making far more art. (It may be that Contemporary artists are mostly working in “movements” that cannot be classified, due to there being around ten artists in any given “movement”, none of which have shot off an email saying that there’s a new “movement” and “could you please tell others?”)

On a more serious note, while it may be hard to classify emergent movements, Contemporary art – collectively – is much more socially conscious than any previous era has been. A whole lot of art from the last 30 years has been connected with one issue or another: feminism, multiculturalism, globalization, bio-engineering and AIDS awareness all come readily to mind as subject matter.

So, there you have it. Contemporary art runs from (roughly) 1970 until now. We won’t have to worry about shifting an arbitrary point on the art timeline for another decade, at least. Go, be of good cheer, and fear not the term “Contemporary Art”.

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What is Manga?

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Morning Star by Masamune Shirow

Many people might say “Manga are Japanese comics, and Anime is the Japanese version of animation. Anime is usually, but not always, the animated version of popular manga.” That’s partially true, but it can be misleading. (Note that “anime” in Japan technically means any animated film, and “manga” is any printed cartoon, but people in the rest of the world take them to mean animated films or comics from Japan.)

First of all, though an outsider might think Japan “stole” comics from the West, this is not true. Japan has been making cartoonish art for a very long time (there are humorous ink drawings of animals and caricatured people from hundreds of years ago, bearing striking resemblances to modern manga). True, some aspects of manga are taken from the West (Osamu Tezuka, the “father” of modern manga, was influenced by Disney and Max Fleisher), but its main features, such as simple lines and stylized features, are distinctly Japanese. It may be that Chinese art had more influence than Western.

(Also, speaking of China, I should note that Anime is now a general Asian phenomenon, not just Japanese. I understand there are many fine works of manga and anime being produced in many places around the world. However, as far as I understand, the roots are in Japan, and Japan is still considered, at least here in the US, the center of the anime world. This may well change in the future.)

The Ghost in the Shell by Masamune Shirow

Secondly, Japanese manga and anime come in all types, for all sorts of people. Unlike the U.S., which generally seems to believe that “comics are for kids” (though this has been changing recently), Japanese manga-ka (manga writers) write for everyone from innocent young children to perverted sex-starved men (there is even a category for ex-juvenile delinquent mothers!). But even the kiddie stuff tends not to be as simple-minded as the American versions (not including intelligent American comics, but more thinking of TV shows).

Children’s manga and TV anime shows in Japan will sometimes depict death — while the U.S. (on children’s TV) seems determined to run away from such realities of life (note how the U.S. version of “GoLion” (“Voltron”) deleted all references to one of the protagonist’s death). And, not surprisingly, much of Japanese manga and anime includes scenes of students in class or doing homework, or of people working in their offices. The work ethic seems omnipresent in the background. Manga and anime also tend to protray technology sympathetically, while some U.S. comics seem almost to avoid it, or revile it, or simplify it as much as possible.

A third major difference is the unique Japanese manga and anime style, which is distinctive and fairly easy to recognize. This is not to say the style is limiting. Within this broad common stylistic ground, each manga artist’s technique is distinct and unique. The stereotype is of characters with huge hair and large eyes, but there are many, many variations, from L. Matsumoto’s seemingly unevenly drawn squash-shaped “ugly” protagonists, to the soft-edged figures in Miyazaki’s work. And, of course, there is less emphasis on the “superhero” world of the U.S..

In most manga, the men and women aren’t necessarily exaggerated extremes of their gender stereotypes, and they wear things other than skin-tight costumes. In fact, manga and anime characters tend to have unique and aesthetic tastes in fashion. (It’s also true that many modern U.S. comics have thankfully broken this stereotype, and serious-matter cartoonists like Alan Moore or Art Spiegelman have always been around.)

And one minor difference between Japanese manga and general superhero comics like D.C. Comics or Marvel Comics (aside from the black and white nature of manga), is that manga are usually the vision of a single writer (though editors have a large say, and sometimes direct the story). Unlike the general superhero type, where many writers tend to do different plots and stories, manga are more like novels, complete and detailed worlds that are the vision of a single author.

The characters remain consistent, and they are allowed to grow and develop. On a related topic, manga also tend to be drawn for a weekly or biweekly publication containing numerous other comics by other authors — and the editors expect cliffhangers/you-really-want-to-read-the-next-issue endings each time. So the plot HAS to develop and HAS to be interesting at a fairly rapid clip. (There are, after all, crowds of hopeful would-be manga-ka waiting in the wings).

(One last difference is the onomatopoetic characteristic of the Japanese language; sound effects fit in much better, and look less stupid, than in English comics. This is just a facet of the language; translated manga sound effects also don’t work as well.)

Perhaps it is the mix of harsh reality with the tantalizing world of fantasy that makes Japanese manga and anime so appealing. Many popular series, such as Doraemon, Ranma 1/2 and Kimagure Orange Road, follow the lives of seemingly ordinary people — they go to school, do homework, get reprimanded by parents — who have a shadow life that makes them somehow special, whether by psionic talent or friends who are rather different (robots from the future, or aliens from other worlds). I suppose all this serves to allow the reader to sympathize with the characters, and yet escape from bland, normal daily life to a fantasy world that is far different.

Even in worlds that exist in the far future, or long ago, the reader is drawn into a 3-dimensional character, one who is far from perfect, one who has stupid little habits or major character flaws — and who has hopes and dreams that the reader can sympathize with. Unlike some American super heroes, who often seem to just go around defeating Evil (as wonderfully spoofed in American comic “The Tick”), Japanese characters usually have other goals in life that play large themes within their lives. I heard recently the characterization that manga and anime are “character oriented.” The more I think about, the more I think this is the right description. Characters aren’t forced into plots, like a foot into a too-tight shoe; instead, stories grow out of the characters. The heart of manga and anime is in the hearts of the characters.

That brings us to three other aspects of manga and anime that I really like: the reality of the world, the spirituality, and the fact that things end.

With comics, the merging of art and words creates a unique medium. The art pulls in the mind, and the words make the reality. A picture may be worth a thousand words, while words may convey what art cannot, but the two types together are truly powerful. As for Anime, animation can do inexpensively what special effects crews couldn’t even touch until the recent rise of computer graphics. Art is a limited form of virtual reality. Art, however, requires plot to make a story come to life.

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Bistro Wall Clock

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Bistro Wall Clock
Bistro Wall Clock by ormsbyeditions
Shop for more Clocks at Zazzle

Clock Style: Square

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Modern Red Yellow Abstract Painting Round Wall Clocks
Modern Red Yellow Abstract Painting Round Wall Clocks by made_in_atlantis
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Snider’s Catsup – Vintage Advertisement Poster

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Snider's Catsup ~ Vintage Advertisement Posters
Snider's Catsup ~ Vintage Advertisement Posters by TheVintageVamp
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Snider’s Catsup

A colorful old food advertisement perfect for your home wall decor. Add a frame and it would make the perfect retro decoration in your bar, cafe, restaurant, home theater, office or kitchen. Framed canvas prints also make an exceptional gift for any occasion or holiday. This incredible antique ad shows amazing artistic talent. The 1800s and early 1900s fine art artist and aspiring painters often supplemented his income of selling drawings and painting by creating these unique advertising ephemera.

sniders catsup poster, vintage art posters, vintage advertisements posters, contemporary art, decorative art prints

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Figurative: Chica Peligrosa Art Print

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Figurative: Chica Peligrosa Art Print

chica peligrosa art print, marco almera artworks, figurative art prints, illustration art, graffitti art, pop surrealism, woman with gun, bar decoration, contemporary art, figurative contemporary art posters

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Abstract: Twisting Love Art Print

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Abstract: Twisting Love Art Print
Megan Aroon Duncanson
Giclee Print
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twisting love art print, giclee prints, megan aroon duncanson artworks, abstract expressionism, modern art prints, contemporary art, decorative art prints, cafe decoration

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Abstract Rectangles & Squares Art Poster Print

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Abstract Rectangles & Squares Art Poster Print
Abstract Rectangles & Squares Art Poster Print by made_in_atlantis
Shop for Posters & Prints online at Zazzle.com

Abstract Rectangles & Squares Art Poster Print

Abstract SquaresArt – Geometric Abstract Rectangles Posters – Geometric Modern Art Print Poster

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Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvas Stacked Sets

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Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 2 Stacked wrappedcanvas
Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 2 Stacked by made_in_atlantis
Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 2 Stacked

From Original Modern Abstract Canvas Painting
Canvas Painting with Digital Effects – Minimalist Abstract Art Canvas Print

Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 3 Stacked wrappedcanvas
Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 3 Stacked by made_in_atlantis
Modern Abstract Paint Wrapped Canvases 3 Stacked

From Original Modern Abstract Canvas Painting
Canvas Painting with Digital Effects – Minimalist Abstract Art Canvas Print

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Zazzle’s matte canvas is made from an acid-free cotton-poly blend and features a special ink-receptive coating that protects the printed surface from cracking when stretched. Made with a tight weave ideal for any photography or fine art, our instant-dry matte canvas produces prints that are fade-resistant for 100+ years.

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