Tag: decorative art

How to Decorate a Home Bar

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Bar Scene by Madjid-Rhanavardkar

Having a home bar can be fun. It is a wonderful place to spend time with your family or having friends over to relax and enjoy a few cocktails. To make the most of your home bar, you should take the time to decorate it in a way that truly reflects your personality while at the same time creating a fun and relaxing. Check out these decorating ideas bar to get some ideas on how to decorate your bar.

Before you even think to start decorating, you should take a moment to consider how you plan to use space and what your personal style is. Looking for a feeling sports bar? Or maybe you are more Class A, feeling more upscale. Think bars, restaurants and clubs you’ve visited and see which ones stand out in your mind. Once you understand the style you like to decorate your bar will become much easier.

One of the most important parts of a bar of the house is the living room. You want everyone to be comfortable and relaxed. Bar stool at the bar are great, but you should also consider adding some additional seats near the bar if space permits. Lounge chairs covered in zebra print pleasure or brightly colored fabric can provide an eclectic feeling in your room.

How to Decorate a Home Bar

For a sports bar, a large comfortable sofa with lots of space is an interesting option to give a few extra seats. When you choose your seats for your bar trying to find parts that are relatively easy to get up. There’s nothing worse than drinking a glass or two and find that you have sunk down into a sofa upholstered as it is difficult to escape!

The artwork that you chose for the walls will also depend heavily on the atmosphere you are trying to create. Vintage posters or framed prints framed in Nice can be a class, so timeless to decorate the walls. If space is on the small side consider hanging around some mirrors visually expand the size of the space. Always try to hang pictures or mirrors approximately at eye level for the average person to avoid having it look like it is too high or too low.

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Fantasy Illustration: Victoria Frances and Vampire Girl’s Kiss

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Fantasy Illustration: Victoria Frances and Vampire Girl's Kiss

Victoria Francés (born October 25, 1982) is a Spanish illustrator.

Victoria Francés was born in Valencia on October 25, 1982, though she spent part of her childhood in Galicia. Later on, she returned to her hometown to earn her degree from the San Carlos School of Fine Arts, at the Polytechnic University of Valencia.

The first volume of the FAVOLE trilogy (Norma Editorial, 2004) was her first illustrated work to be published. Manifested throughout the entirety of the Favole trilogy (2004-2007) are themes emerging from Dark Romanticism, highly influenced by both the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and well known works of Gothic art. Her work received a number of awards and achieved great success in countries where it was published.

Consequently, the American publishing house Dark Horse became interested in her work, and Francés has since then been published in North America, thus allowing her to increase her fan base. She made herself known at the XXII Barcelona Comic Convention, where she made her first public appearance and earned the respect of renowned authors. Calendars featuring her artwork, as well as other promotional merchandise such as posters, puzzles, tarot cards and stationery products have been made available to the public for purchase.

Victoria Frances

Despite the current effervescent nature of the Gothic movement, Victoria decided to experiment with different themes, and in 2007 the course of her artistic career took another direction with the publication of ARLENE’S HEART (El Corazón de Arlene) by Planeta DeAgostini. Within the pages of this book, the author mixes dreams with social reality.

In 2009, she reveals yet another change in her artistic register with the publication of the first volume in her MISTY CIRCUS series (Norma Editorial), an original collection of books based on the decadent world of the travelling circus, written especially for a younger audience. Near the end of that same year, DARK SANCTUARY was also published (Astiberri Ediciones), written in collaboration with Dark Sanctuary, a “Dark Atmospheric” band from France. The project, a fusion between music and illustration, aimed to reflect the poignant beauty of the shadows.

The second volume in the MISTY CIRCUS series is entitled THE NIGHT OF THE WITCHES (La Noche de las Brujas), published by Norma Editorial in 2010. The continuation of the story takes place on the night of Samhain, an ancestral celebration in the pagan culture.

In 2011, the Favole trilogy was re-edited in order to create one single volume entitled INTEGRAL FAVOLE (Norma Editorial), a compilation of the three books in addition to unpublished sketches and illustrations specially included in this edition. A year later, in 2012, OCEAN LAMENT (El Lamento del Océano) was published, in which the author features a listless, spectral mermaid as the main protagonist.

While working on her upcoming books, Victoria Francés was also busy creating individual licensed images for her merchandise, undertaking commissioned work and collaborating with other artists through various illustrations. One of the most noteworthy of these collaborative projects was the illustration “Hekate” which was specially made for the album entitled “Luna” for the German Pagan Folk band, Faun, and the full artwork for a new cd project entitled “Naked Harp” of the Pagan Folk band, Omnia.

At the end of 2014, Victoria presented her new project called MANDRAKMOORS, in collaboration with the South Korean bjd doll company, Fairyland. For this project, the author set out to combine both the work of new character design, specifically of characters related to the world of witchcraft and pagan traditions, with the subsequent creation of bjd dolls, in partnership with FairyLand.

Victoria Francés is currently completing her first piece for MANDRAKMOORS. The protagonist is Sionna Fómhar, the first character and bjd doll in the MandrakMoors universe. This work is scheduled to be released at the end of 2015.

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Introducing American Cowgirl

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Introducing American Cowgirl

born and bred poster, cowgirl posters, decorative art, Giclee Prints, Illustration Art, vintage art, vintage art posters, World Cultures

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Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

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Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

Home decor gets a dash of drama with movie posters. The trick is in picking the right one for the right space and customizing it for the interiors.

The fancy for movie posters as a statement of style in home decor is a relatively recent trend. In the home interiors segment, in which art continues to top customer wish-lists, movie posters are still considered niche territory. But there’s probably nothing more gratifying for the incorrigible movie fan — there’s a bit of him in all of us, anyway — than having the walls around mounted with posters of favourite films.

Wall Decoration and Movie Themes

Arriving at a theme for the rooms — from romance, mystery and such — can be a start to wall decoration. Posters of films that coincide with real-life phases can add that personal bit to the decor. You can also mix the movie posters up as a sequence — James Bond from different ages, for instance — or fix them together in a collage. All, needless to say, in tune with the basics of wall decoration and colour schemes of the room.

Decorating Ideas: Movie Posters for Home Decoration

Classic Movie Posters

Posters of classic movies are eternal favourites, a testimony reflected in the rise in the number of online groups selling them. Casablanca, Gone With The Wind and Alfred Hitchcock thrillers continue to be good draws in the classic movie posters segment but you are doing up your place and it’s your pick that counts.

So the gangster genre fan in you can go for the classic split-on Scarface poster and the rom-com lovers have the now-legendary Pretty Woman poster. Again, the range is all out there and it’s for you to make the choice. Though the idea works on personalization, classic movie posters look better in the living room and it helps to innovate while picking and arranging the line-up of posters.

Presenting Movie Posters For Interiors

Vintage posters come with the advantage of never having to look “old” but it doesn’t work with all movie posters. That’s reason enough to focus more on ways to present them to accentuate the home’s interiors. The old, trusted wooden frames bring a certain elegance to the posters as you mount them on the walls. But it’s again important to customize; The Matrix wouldn’t look good in one, would it?

Wall decoration of the personal home theatre with movie posters can, in an understated way, enrich your movie-watching experience. The fancied back-lit poster box is still the best option in mounting movie posters, especially in home theatres. For the regular mounts, there are many available sizes — 24×36 and 20×20 among popular dimensions — to be picked according to the clarity of the image and the available wall space.

Identifying the right poster for the right space is critical. Quirks apart, it always makes sense to avoid The Fist Of Fury in the study and, the horror of horrors, Psycho in the bath.

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The Legend of Lady Godiva, 1897

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The Legend of Lady Godiva, 1897

Some 900 years ago an extraordinary occurrence took place on Market Day in the English midlands town of Coventry. Two monks at St. Albans Abbey in Hertfordshire first recorded this amazing story in Latin. Roger of Wendover wrote of it in the twelfth century and Mathew Paris in the early thirteenth century. As the Abbey stood at an important road junction, it would seem that the monks may have heard the story from travellers who were on their way from the Midlands to London.

The astonishing tale that has come down to us through the centuries, is that sometime in the eleventh-century a proud, pious lady rode through Coventry on Market Day completely naked, covered by nothing but her long hair!

Was this true? Apparently so! Who was this pious medieval streaker?

Lady Godiva was the lady, wife of Leofric, the Earl of Mercia. Earl Leofric was one of the all-powerful lords who ruled England under the Danish King Canute.
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Art Nouevau: A decorative-art movement centered in Western Europe

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Art Nouevau: A decorative-art movement centered in Western Europe

Art Nouevau is decorative-art movement centered in Western Europe. It began in the 1880s as a reaction against the historical emphasis of mid-19th-century art, but did not survive World WarI. Art nouveau originated in London and was variously called Jugendstil in Germany, Sezessionstil in Austria, and Modernismo in Spain.

In general it was most successfully practiced in the decorative arts: furniture, jewelry, and book design and illustration. The style was richly ornamental and asymmetrical, characterized by a whiplash linearity reminiscent of twining plant tendrils. Its exponents chose themes fraught with symbolism, frequently of an erotic nature. They imbued their designs with dreamlike and exotic forms.

The outstanding designers of art nouveau in England include the graphic artist Aubrey Beardsley, A. H. Mackmurdo, Charles Ricketts, Walter Crane, and the Scottish architect Charles R. Mackintosh; in Belgium the architects Henry Van de Velde and Victor Horta; in France the architect and designer of the Paris métro entrances, Hector Guimard, and the jewelry designer René Lalique; in Austria the painter Gustav Klimt; in Spain the architect Antonio Gaudí; in Germany the illustrator Otto Eckmann and the architect Peter Behrens; in Italy the originator of the ornamental Floreale style, Giuseppe Sommaruga; and in the United States Louis Sullivan, whose architecture was dressed with art nouveau detail, and the designer of elegant glassware Louis C. Tiffany.

The aesthetics of the movement were disseminated through various illustrated periodicals including The Century Guild Hobby Horse (1894), The Dial (1889), The Studio (begun, 1893), The Yellow Book (1894–95), and The Savoy (1896–98). The works of Beardsley and Tiffany were especially popular.

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Endless Love and Figurative Abstract

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Endless Love and Figurative Abstract

Alfred Gockel, Alexander (he goes by Alex, but his name is “Alfred”) was born in the coal mining town Lüdinghausen, Germany in 1952. Gockel’s first work was published when he was only eight years. He wanted to become an engineer, but at the age of 16 Gockel started working in the coal mines in Germany. When the mining industry has slowed, many locals found themselves unemployed.

The struggle Gockel felt at that time continues to do his work of art today. “I like to touch the soul of the viewer with my colors,” says Gockel. “Often in my paintings I use elements that reflect my difficult past, when a boy, I worked in coal mines. But my goal is to express my joy of life, and show that we can overcome many obstacles through the expressions of the beauties of life. ”

After more than two years in the army, Gockel refocused its attention on the arts and in 1973 he enrolled at the Polytechnic Academy in Munster, Germany. Gockel studied art and design and learned the techniques of lithography and serigraphy. After graduation, Gockel teaches graphic design and typography at the Academy. In the early 1980s Gockel has decided to concentrate on his art full time. In 1983 he and his wife Ingrid founded an art publishing company, Art Before, a player currently ranked in the abstract segment of the market, with customers in over 50 countries worldwide.

From its humble beginnings, Gockel has become one of the most prolific distributors of posters of modern art in the world. According to some estimates, sales in more than 10 million worldwide, they can be seen in design studios and private and large companies in the world. Gockel, was commissioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee to create an official piece of artwork for the 2006 Olympics in Turin, Italy.

Gockel’s unique style – boldly colored abstract images doubled in thick black on a white canvas – has become his signature. “The art in both culture and the influences he imitates,” Gockel said. “I’m influenced by colors, symbols, textures, fibers and models used by different cultures around the world. ”

Still active in his “spare time” Gockel plays tennis, walks in the German forests with his two dogs, or riding Harley Davidson with his wife. They enjoy spending time at their favorite spot on the island of Sylt.

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Retro Room: Beach Bungalow

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Retro Room: Beach Bungalow

Richie Fahey and His Photography

New York City photographer Richie Fahey paints his pictures in a cold water flat, surrounded by his inspiration: a huge collection of paperbacks in 1930-1960s, mold and pulp detective. With the help of a manual fan of post-war oil Coloring Pictures for fun and profit, he learned to transform photos into black and white to glorious color by bubbling with pigments on snapshots of the 40s .

Technicolor-style lobby cards as Fahey mentioned in the houses of old movies, novels and covers portraits dimestore star fan magazines such as screen and Photoplay. In defining his style, Fahey was inspired by pictures in magazine posed detective, director of photography for the 1940’s-50 as John Alton, portrait photographers like George Hurrell, and as painters and illustrators and James Leeteg Avanti.

In creating his images, Fahey plays with the stereotype of black beautiful women that has gone wrong and the men who love them. He is meticulous stylistic detail. Convincing the artistic direction, combined with lighting techniques and hand coloring vintage combine to create attractive, ambiguous works. The inability of the viewer to identify the exact time when a photograph has been taken Fahey, lends a certain timelessness to work from the artist.

Fahey has created book covers for Penguin, Scribner, Warner Books, Vintage, ST. Martin’s Press, Knopf and Simon & Schuster. Other commercial clients include Sony Records, Adobe Theatre Co. and Design Spot. His clients have included Sports Illustrated editorial, GOTHAM, bust, atomic physics and magazines Flatiron. Fahey produced and co-designed the cover for James Bond novels reissued.

Fahey was presented in juxtaposing art review, camera art, Yellow Rat Bastard and GARAGE. His work has been presented to the Robin Rice Gallery in New York’s Greenwich Village and posters of his work are available for purchase online at VintageArte.com. His 2004 calendar pinup, women in crime watch, beautiful women caught secretly commit various crimes fun.

Fahey studied painting at the University of South Caroline and photography at the Rochester Institute Technology.

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Asian Influence: Bamboo Inspired Decoration

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Asian Influence: Bamboo Inspired Decoration

It is the most environmental lighting product that make the home open and peaceful, either as an accessory in a home or integrated into a China atmosphere, Bamboo home decoration brings minimalism and flexibility. The Bamboo represents strength and the virtues of the male, reflecting a sense of perfect balance with upright integrity and tremendous flexibility, which is ideal for living room and workstation.

Lighting is one of the main applications of bamboo, which is the diffused for giving the warm glow. With the bamboo blind unique design, projects a diffused light to surrounding and creates a fusion of warm atmosphere. It’s made with bamboo leafs with the lighting paper together for creating the unique feeling for desktop lighting and perform also a home decor too. Get the unique feeling that any materials never provide for you before.

Eco-friendly Bamboo Lighting Design for Bedroom which is made with the real bamboo leafs covered with the lighting paper together, and the frame is made with bamboo too. It integrates the Japan and China elements together for making such unique effect. Which is typically good for home use especially after switch off the main lighting supply for creating the romance feeling.

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What Is Contemporary Art?

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What Is Contemporary Art?

Contemporary just means “art that has been and continues to be created during our lifetimes”. In other words, contemporary to us.

Now, of course, if you are 96-years old and reading this (By the way, congratulations, if this describes you. Way to keep up with the times!), you can expect a certain amount of overlapping between “Contemporary” and “Modern” art in your lifetime. A good rule of thumb is:

• Modern Art: Art from the Impressionists (say, around 1880) up until the 1960’s or 70’s.

• Contemporary Art: Art from the 1960’s or 70’s up until this very minute.

Here at About Art History, 1970 is the cut-off point for two reasons. First, because it was around 1970 that the terms “Postmodern” and “Postmodernism” popped up – meaning, we must assume, that the Art World had had its fill of Modern Art starting right then.

Secondly, 1970 seems to be the last bastion of easily classified artistic movements. If you look at the outline of Modern Art, and compare it to the outline of Contemporary Art, you’ll quickly notice that there are far more entries on the former page. This, in spite of the fact that Contemporary Art enjoys far more working artists making far more art. (It may be that Contemporary artists are mostly working in “movements” that cannot be classified, due to there being around ten artists in any given “movement”, none of which have shot off an email saying that there’s a new “movement” and “could you please tell others?”)

On a more serious note, while it may be hard to classify emergent movements, Contemporary art – collectively – is much more socially conscious than any previous era has been. A whole lot of art from the last 30 years has been connected with one issue or another: feminism, multiculturalism, globalization, bio-engineering and AIDS awareness all come readily to mind as subject matter.

So, there you have it. Contemporary art runs from (roughly) 1970 until now. We won’t have to worry about shifting an arbitrary point on the art timeline for another decade, at least. Go, be of good cheer, and fear not the term “Contemporary Art”.

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