Tag: Female Artists

Trish Biddle and Art-Deco Style Artworks

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Trish Biddle and Art-Deco Style Artworks

Trish Biddle is published internationally, and is collected around the world. Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, American artist Trish Biddle studied at the Dallas Institute of Art, before beginning her career as an illustrator and textile designer. Her process of drawing, painting and designing melded onto canvases, creating romantic images and her unmistakable Art Deco figurative paintings.

Her expertise in capturing nature and light creates richly colored, breath-taking canvases. With a well-defined style, broad, romantic strokes and vibrant color, Trish paints figurative, floral, fashion icons and children’s art. She travels the world and enjoys translating her experiences into oil on canvas.

Trish Biddle

Showcasing her sense of design, Trish captures the Art Deco style of fashion, elegance, sophistication and the simplicity of the era. Tamara De Lempicka who defined Art Deco painting as we know it, Argentinean tango dancers and depression era dance marathons have all inspired Trish’s vintage, figurative paintings. The faces are obscured purposely to allow the viewer to identify with the images of the graceful dancers their own romantic notions. Backgrounds are evidence of textile, ironwork and architectural designs extracted from her own designs and travels. Trish currently resides in Westlake Texas.

Trish Biddle paintings are in corporate and private collections around the world, and she has been published internationally by Encore Art Group – Win Devon, Canadian Art Prints, Portal. Her art is available at most major retailers including Bed Bath & Beyond, Wal-mart, Target, Tuesday Morning, Michaels, TJ Maxx, and e-tailer art.com. Trish has had over $1 million in retail sales and been commissioned by Hilton hotels, Churchill Downs, Westminster Kennel Club and Del Mar Thoroughbread Club. Actress Eva Longoria Parker is a fan of Trish’s work, and used her art for her charity, Padres Contra El Cancer in Los Angeles.

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Photo Finish and Trish Biddle Story

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Photo Finish and Trish Biddle Story

Trish grew up in Minnesota in the world of art along side her mother who enrolled her in every art class and contests in which she would usually come in second place. This made her work even harder. Then on her own, she moved to Dallas fresh out of high school and graduated from the Dallas Institute of Art.

Pursuing her artistic dream, she secured a job as a textile designer and a fashion illustrator for a clothing manufacturer. She later moved to the J.C. Penney home office in the design department. After several years in the corporate world, she decided that it wasn’t for her, so went to work as a freelance artist. She was signed by a textile agent in New York City and continued to freelance for several years.

In the summer of 1996 Trish’s beloved Grandmother passed away and Trish was given an old cigar box full of vintage photos. She took the next couple of years to reflect and be inspired by these photos and realized it was time to pursue her dream of being a full time painter. Trish was signed by her publisher Canadian Art Prints, Vancouver B.C. in 2003 and produced over 40 images currently being sold around the globe. Her prints are sold in retail outlets globally.

After years of persistence and overcoming obstacles Trish’s rewards are coming to fruition. Invited to be the Official Artist of the 2008 Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks, and as the Official Artist of the 2009 Westminster Dog Show, she is now fulfilling her lifelong dream of being an important artist.

Trish’s paintings reflect the Art Deco era to such a convincing degree you can’t help but wonder how she transported herself to capture that lovely era. Her motto is to inspire others, especially girls and women, helping them reach their goals by setting a positive example.

Trish has given back to the community by contributing original artwork to charity which has been more rewarding then any amount of fame she says. The organizations include Girl Scouts, Make a Wish Foundation, Shining Stars, Arts Net, Young Artist’s of Texas, Greater Southlake Women’s Society, Southwest Transplant Foundation, Westlake Academy, Greater Southlake Women’s Society and GRACE donating paintings to help raise funds. Trish donated the original artist’s proofs of her winning Kentucky Derby designs to Girl Scouts for the live auction at their fundraiser, Derby Day at Lone Star Park.

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Nicole Etienne Powell and Still Life Art

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Nicole Etienne Powell and Still Life Art

“Painting is just like love making. Sometimes slow, sensuous strokes of the brush and prolonged drags of charcoal are right. And other times quick splatters and fast lush swipes of color are the technical narrative a painting needs to reveal the story. One of my favorite artists, Eric Fischl, told me that if I am not feeling what I am painting, nobody else will either. I actualize joy while creating art, sort of rev up the engine and materialize sex, love, lust… whatever it is I am trying to evoke.”

Born in Santa Cruz California in 1974, Nicole Etienne Powell grew up between redwood trees and suburban Silicon Valley. Her mother, an active artist, kept Nicole healthily covered in paint and dirt and nurtured her budding career with full access to her supply cabinet.

After moving to the Bay Area her family joined a liberal California utopian group which focused on human rights, anti-war activism, and the belief that by surrendering to a process of personal transformation they were to achieve a greater awareness of the earth and each other. Nicole was encouraged to be intuitive and explore.

Nicole Etienne Powell and Still Life Art

It wasn’t long before the conservative, buttoned-up world of Silicon Valley felt a little too parochial. She traveled widely, studying, painting and exhibiting, and in NYC Nicole was able to find her footing — and her voice. She has created work of sincere and tender human encounters. Painting lush groves with strong “angelic amazons” that blossom with sexuality and womanhood, she twists old myths with new, creating woman as the “romantic hero” in a world completely of her own.

Her technique copies the brightness of watercolor with the thickness of oil paint. A struggle between keeping the original marks of charcoal and the glow of the underpainting; and the desire to smear on thick hunks of paint until it melts together.

Nicole began her collegiate art education at UC Santa Barbara transferring to UC Santa Cruz where she received her BFA in 1997. She studied abroad at the Lorenzo Medici School of art in Italy and graduated with her MFA cum laude in 2009 from the New York Academy of Art.

She has painted and lived in Italy, London, and Ireland. It was on a trip to Cornwall, England, that Nicole met her husband, creative director Peter Powell. They now live in New York City with their cat Moo.

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Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

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Ruth Palmer: Influenced by Kandinsky and Manet

Spontaneity. With no pretense, or explanation, Ruth Palmer paints contemporary abstracts by feeling her way through the process and connecting to the soul of the subject, without concern for distinctions between representation and abstraction.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Palmer now resides in Calgary, Canada. While her primary influence is spiritual, based in Christianity; her art is also influenced by the richness of Manet’s impressionist works and what she deems the “colorful play and balance” of Kandinsky’s. Like Kandinsky, for whom spiritual influences counted heavily, there’s a certain intentional separation with Palmer’s art that allows viewers to participate in creating the artwork. The disunion is repaired when the painted form connects to the viewer’s soul.

Ruth’s works are extremely popular in print, particularly in the design market and hospitality industry. Her paintings and digital renderings can be enjoyed in many hotels and corporate offices worldwide. Recently Ruth was asked to create a collection for installation on one of Pullmantur’s new cruise ships and one of her best-selling pieces “Luscious Red” can be found in the new release of “The Spirituality Of Sex” by Wood Lake Publishing – a Canadian Christian Publisher.

Original paintings are currently in private collections throughout Canada, the United States, Australia, England and Scandinavia.

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Fantasy Art: Ophelia by Olivia Charmaine

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Fantasy Art: Ophelia by Olivia Charmaine

fantasy art prints, Female Artists, figurative art prints, olivia charmaine artworks, ophelia art print

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Fantasy Art: Black Widow by Josefine Jonsson

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Fantasy Art: Black Widow by Josefine Jonsson
Josefine Jönsson Artworks

Josefine Jönsson is a photographer and fantasy artist based in Sweden. “I want to create a world that exists between dreams and reality. Where I can go my own way and let my feelings and thoughts take part in a piece of art.” Josefine’s work is absolutely amazing, and a mix between classy and psychodelic worlds.

Please enjoy this inspiring collection of expressive photography, let us know which one is your favourite in the comments below. Or check out her website for more inspirations.

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Portrait de Mademoiselle Channel by Marie Laurencin

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Portrait de Mademoiselle Channel by Marie Laurencin

Born on October 31, 1883 in Paris, the young Marie Laurencin was sent to Sèvres by her mother in 1901, where she got familiar with porcelain painting. Her education continued at a school in Paris, followed by the Humbert academy, where Marie Laurencin got acquainted with Georges Braque. She soon met Picasso and Guillaume Apollinaire, who supported her from this time on and integrated her in discussions about art theory, which soon lead to Cubism.

The artist’s own creative work, however, remained untouched by such theoretical demands; it shows mainly lyrical motifs like graceful, dreamy young girls in pastel coloring and soft shading. This color-sensitive inventiveness leads to a variation of repetitions of form and motifs. The influence of Persian miniature painting and Rococo art are undeniable in Laurencin’s works.

In 1907 Marie Laurencin gave her debut at the “Salon des Indépendants,” followed by a large exhibition at Barbazanges’ in 1912 and at P. Rosenberg’s in 1920. From 1924 Laurencin also worked on designing stage sets. She produced stage design for Diaghilev’s “Ballets russe” and the set for the “Comédie Francaise” in 1928. She also illustrated books, such as André Gide’s “La Tentative Amoureuse” and Lewis Caroll’s “Alice in Wonderland.”

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Gabriella Benevolenza and Abstract Expressionism

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Gabriella Benevolenza - Horizon Bleue Art Print

Gabriella Benevolenza, a young woman of Italian-Finnish descent was born in Helsinki, Finland in July, 1968. She was raised in various countries finally settling in Alsace (France), where she lives and paints. She studied “Arts plastique” from 1992 – 1995. She is now a valued member of AIDA (Artistes Independent d’Alsace).

Always very “constructed”, her semi-abstract work is a search for transparancy and colour balance: light and the variations of adding different types of material. She uses plaster of paris, metal pigmented paints, various types of cloth, emery paper or printed collage material.

Gabriella Benevolenza

Gabriella Benevolenza always uses collages and sometimes a square stencil. She gives rythme to her paintings by using horinzontal and/or vertical lines. On a symbolised landscape, a horizontal division may suggest houses, a small harbor, bottles or a simple forms and colors harmony, that no title helps the viewer with orientation.

The artist, herself, often remarks that: “ I may not see anything”

The most important is not the title, but the harmony of the complete color palette : from warm colours to bright orange, smooth and delicate greys, astonishing beiges that illuminate a wide space. A red point may bring , in true freedom, the final touch.

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Lesbian Kissing by Tanya Chalkin

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Lesbian Kissing by Tanya Chalkin

Tanya Chalkin is a celebrity portrait photographer and image maker based in London.

Tanya’s love of photography began at a very early age when she travelled the world with her parents, snapping the exciting cultures & locations they found themselves in. With her passion fuelled, she went on to study a Foundation Course at Chelsea College Of Art and Design and gain her BA (Hons) in Photography at The London College Of Printing.

She has shot major fashion and editorial portraits for publications such as Dazed & Confused, British Esquire, The Face, Arena Hommes Plus, Attitude, FHM Collections, FHM, The Guardian Weekend Magazine, The Evening Standard and The Independent.

Tanya’s unique eye for shooting portrait photography has given her the opportunity to photograph such talent as Jamie Dornan, Professor Green, Katherine Jenkins, Diane Von Furstenberg, Isabella Blow. Mary Portas, Jamie Cullum, Suzy Menkes, Nadav Kander, Rory Mcilroy, Tomas Berdych, Tom Aikens, Darcey Bussell, Dawn French.

Tanya Chalkin
Tanya Chalkin

Her commercial Clients include PETA , Triumph Motorcycles, Universal Music, Warner Records, Universal Pictures, BBC, Telecoms giant ZTE, LOCOG (London 2012 Olympic Games).

As well as her editorial work, Tanya is also a creator of many top selling photographic merchandising images. Her image KISS is an iconic, global, top selling poster and several of her London-scape images were selected by LOCOG as official merchandising posters for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Tanya lives in London where she can be found daily in the city’s parks & hills walking her dog Romeo.

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Chanel Creations: Fashion for the Wealthy

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Chanel Creations: Fashion for the Wealthy

At the earlly of 1920’s Chanel’ s designs were for the leisured rich, the new international set who traveled Europe and the United States in a restless search for seasonal diversions; and the irony of her fashions was that she gave the richest women in the world a look that was indistinguishable from that of a shop girl or office worker.

Dressed in this ultra-chic “poor look” – in a sirnple black dress either with a demure white Peter Pan collar, or, more likely, completely unadomed – the society women who affected it paid everything for a fashion that looked like nothing and reduced women’ s dress to a minimalist uniform of understatement. Chanel even designed necklaces of uncut diamonds and emeralds that looked as though they were made of common glass.

This, then, was an inversion of values in the so-called democratic century. Dress was no longer a matter of direct display; instead, fashion adopted the language of the streets and of the common man (man, not woman, for both sexes). Chanel flung a trenchcoat around her shoulders and it became the latest thing; jersey, corduroy and tweed, once used to make only workmen’s or country clothes, were transformed into high fashion. The concept of casual wear was born.

By this time high fashion was an international movement. Paul Poiret had already toured the United States, where he had been horrified to find his exclusive designs pirated everywhere. By 1930 Seventh Avenue (the New York City garment district) was adapting Chanel’s designs for the mass market – and their sirnpIicity meant that they were highly suitable for mass production.

In the following year Chanel was invited to Hollywood by Sam Goldwyn. The “poor girI” look that Chanel had made her own was similar to that popularized by Louise Brooks on the screen, where she played ordinary city girls, “good sorts” and tomboys. Goldwyn invited Chanel to dress his stars because she was the most prestigious of all dress designers, but as it turned out her designs were too understated for Hollywood. After designing Gloria Swanson’ s wardrobe for Tonight or Neuer (1931) she retumed to Paris, unenthralled by the celluloid capital, which in tum had no use for her Iittle-or-nothing clothes.

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