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Photography Art: Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989

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Photography Art: Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989

The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, also known as the Tiananmen Square massacre and the June Fourth Incident (in part to avoid confusion with two prior Tiananmen Square protests), were a series of demonstrations in and near Tiananmen Square in Beijing in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) beginning on 14 April 1989. The movement, influenced partly by the ideas of Mohandas K. Gandhi, used mainly non-violent methods and can be considered a case of civil resistance. Led mainly by students and intellectuals, the protests occurred in the year that was to see the collapse of a number of communist governments in eastern Europe.

The protests were sparked by the death of former CPC General Secretary Hu Yaobang, a Party official known for tolerating dissent, and whom protesters had wanted to mourn. By the eve of Hu’s funeral, 100,000 people had gathered at Tiananmen Square. The protests lacked a unified cause or leadership; participants included Communist Party of China members and Trotskyists as well as liberal reformers, who were generally against the government’s authoritarianism and voiced calls for economic change and democratic reform within the structure of the government. The demonstrations began in Tiananmen Square, but later expanded to the surrounding streets, and large-scale protests also occurred in cities throughout China, including Shanghai. While those in Shanghai remained peaceful, there was looting and rioting in various locations throughout China, including Xi’an Province and Changsha, capital of Mao’s home province of Hunan.

The movement lasted seven weeks after Hu’s death on 15 April. In early June, the People’s Liberation Army moved into the streets of Beijing with troops and tanks and cleared the square with live fire. The exact number of deaths is not known. According to an analysis by Nicholas D. Kristof of The New York Times, “The true number of deaths will probably never be known, and it is possible that thousands of people were killed without leaving evidence behind. But based on the evidence that is now available, it seems plausible that about fifty soldiers and policemen were killed, along with 400 to 800 civilians.” Globe and Mail correspondent Jan Wong placed the death toll at approximately 3,000, based on initial reports by the Red Cross and analysis on the crowd size, density, and the volume of firing.

Following the conflict, the government conducted widespread arrests of protesters and their supporters, cracked down on other protests around China, banned the foreign press from the country and strictly controlled coverage of the events in the PRC press. Members of the Party who had publicly sympathized with the protesters were purged, with several high-ranking members placed under house arrest, such as Party General Secretary Zhao Ziyang. There was widespread international condemnation of the PRC government’s use of force against the protesters.

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Erotic Art: Passion at the Beach

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Erotic Art: Passion at the Beach

erotic art posters, erotic photography, framed art prints, passion art print, photography art, women photography

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Fashion Art: Fashion and Modernity

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Fashion Art: Fashion and Modernity

Chanel’s collaboration with the Parisian artistic avant garde had been much more successful. As early as 1922 she worked with Jean Codeau, Picasso and the composer Arthur Honegger on a production of the classical Greek play Antigone; and from 1923 to 1927 she worked with Sergei Diaghilev and Codeau on ballet designs.

For the first of their joint works, Le Train Bleu, a fantasy about the Riviera, the dancers were costumed in bathing suits, pullovers and tennis or golf shoes, and the leading female role was a tennis player. So fashion, sport and the artistic avant-garde united to celebrate the modernity of modem life, and Chanel’s little black dress (American Vogue called it the “Ford of fashion”) became the epitome of modernist style.

The modernist movement in art transcended both national boundaries and those of artistic form, influencing all the arts from architecture to the novel. Visually, it was the embodiment of the ideal of speed, science and the machine. It was a love affair with a rationalist, utopian future, and in architecture and design this led to an ascetic functionalism that considered houses and flats as machines for living, fumiture and household artefacts as items for use, not ornament, and even human beings as machines.

More than almost any other aspect of mass culture, high fashion acted as a conduit for this esthetic, translating it into a popular language of pared-down design and understated chic. In architecture, the Bauhaus movement created buildings that used glass to reveal the inner workings of the design. They stripped away the superfluous ornament that had cluttered 19th-century architecture with what was now regarded as the sentimental idealization of a past recreated in pastiche.

In dress, too, the watchword was now functionalism; clothing was simply an envelope for the body, which it impeded as little as possible. If there was to be adornment of any kind, it was to be of the art deco variety. Art deco was so called after the Exhibition des Arts Decoratifs, held in Paris in 1925. This exhibition had in a sense inaugurated the idea of a lifestyle, though the expression was not then used. It included a Pavilion of Elegance, in which the fashion designs of Chanel and Poiret, among others, were displayed. They complemented the furniture, ceramics and architecture – throughout, the few ornamental motifs and bright colors permitted were definite, clean-cut and jazzy.

In literature and painting, part of the modernism of modem art had been that the work of art interrogated its own intentions and questioned its own form. Perhaps what Cecil Beaton was to describe as the “nihilism” of the Chanel look was modernist too: it not only mocked the vulgarity of conspicuous consumption but, in inventing a look that was universal, international and reduced to the minimum, it almost sought to abolish fashion itself, creating instead a classic look that defied the one essential of fashion – change. At the same time the geometric, angular design of women’s clothing imitated the clean, spare lines of modern abstract art and design. Woman was no longer treated as a voluptuous animal; she had become a futurist machine.

Fashion thus disseminated the new esthetic of the modernist avant garde across two continents, and radically altered the way in which erotic beauty was conceived. Fashion became, superfiicially at least, classIess, and the great thing for a woman was no longer to look grand, but simply to look modem.

For the first time the New World and the Old engaged in a mutual cultural exchange of style and imagery. Although Paris stillled the way, the vamps and innocents of Hollywood – Theda Bara, Gloria Swanson, Mary Pickford, Louise Brooks constructed new tastes in beauty, while the “lost generation” of American expatriates settled in Paris and the south of France. Some of these hoped to create a new art and a literature that would reflect the often excessive and even tragic pleasure-seeking of the postwar generation.

Emest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald and many others tried to be as well as to describe a modern breed of sexually free beings, women and men whose minds, hearts and bodies were as untrammeled by traditional nations of morality as their bodies were by constricting clothes. Fitzgerald’s characters “discovered” the Riviera in summer until then it had been only a winter resort – and the suntan became another sign of working-class toil to migrate up the social scale.

It became the status symbol of the globetrotter, who need never work and whose wealth permitted this inversion of established tastes. Society ladies took care to become brown as navvies, and Fitzgerald’ s heroine wore only pearls and a low-backed white bathing suit to set off her iodine-colored skin as she lay on the Mediterranean sands.

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Lana del Rey Cover For iPhone 5

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Lana del Rey Covers For iPhone 5
Lana del Rey Covers For iPhone 5 by Rupydetequila
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Lana Del Rey – Personal Life

Lana Del Rey stated that she has suffered from alcohol dependence. At the age of 15, she was sent to Kent School, a boarding school in Connecticut, for three years to get sober. In September 2012, she told GQ magazine:

I was a big drinker at the time. I would drink every day. I would drink alone. I thought the whole concept was so fucking cool. A great deal of what I wrote on Born To Die is about these wilderness years. When I write about the thing that I’ve lost I feel like I’m writing about alcohol because that was the first love of my life. My parents were worried, I was worried.

I knew it was a problem when I liked it more than I liked doing anything else. I was like, ‘I’m fucked. I am totally fucked’. Like, at first it’s fine and you think you have a dark side – it’s exciting – and then you realise the dark side wins every time if you decide to indulge in it. It’s also a completely different way of living when you know that…a different species of person. It was the worst thing that ever happened to me.

Del Rey’s left hand is tattooed with the letter “M”, referencing her grandmother, Madeleine, and the word “paradise”. Her right hand is tattooed with the phrase “trust no one”. She also has the phrase “die young” tattooed on her right ring finger. She has been in a relationship with Kassidy ex-member Barrie-James O’Neill since August 2011. Del Rey has two apartments, one in New York City and one in Los Angeles, where she lives with her sister and brother. Del Rey is Roman Catholic. She is a supporter of the English Premier League team Liverpool and Scottish Premier League side Celtic.

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Hush Premium Photographic Print

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Hush Premium Photographic Print

hush photographic print, photography art, premium photographic prints, erotic photography, women photography, black and white photography, decorative art prints, figurative art prints

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Photographer’s time-delay exotic artworks

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Photographer's time-delay exotic artworks

Photographer's time-delay exotic artworks

Amateur photographer David Johnson used a time-delay exposure to get exotic images.

David Johnson took the pictures during Spain’s entry into the competition, which spanned five evenings in August. To capture the fireworks images, David Johnson didn’t use common exposure settings that other photographers might use. Instead, Johnson fixed his focus around certain points of the fireworks, and then quickly refocused his lens as the rockets exploded midair, according to the Daily Mail.

“The technique I used was a simple refocus during the longer exposure,” says Johnson, an amateur photographer from Ottawa. “Each shot was about a second long, sometimes two,” Johnson says. “I’d start out of focus, and when I heard the explosion, I would quickly refocus so the little stems on these deep sea creature lookalikes would grow into a fine point.”

But with a slight bit of imagination, it’s not hard to see what might be a rare flower. Or, a strange bioluminescent creature pictured at nighttime on a coral reef, perhaps a sea anemone?

“The shapes are quite bizarre,” Johnson says. “Some of them was I pleasantly surprised with.”

Johnson has been taking pictures for about three years, according to his web site. “I’m always eager to get new gear, try different photography techniques, and take my camera everywhere I go,” he says. “I take photos for myself. That’s all,” he adds. “Going through the photos after a good day of shooting is the exact experience I love.”

Johnson’s photography portfolio includes people, animals, nature, travels, and sports. Indeed, these images could pass for many things: Flowers, sea creatures, distant stars and planets, or perhaps microbial organisms inside another living thing.

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WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun Posters

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WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun print
WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun by Photoblog
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WW1 Motorcycle Machine Gun Posters

Old photo of U.S. Army soldiers riding World War One machine gun mounted on motorcycle with sidecar. Probably taken in 1910s.

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Greek-American Soldiers: 1943 Posters

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Greek-American Soldiers: 1943 Print
Greek-American Soldiers: 1943 by Photoblog
Browse Other Vintage War Pictures Posters

Greek-American Soldiers: 1943 Posters

Old WW2 photo of Greek trainees at the anti-aircraft artillery training center, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. Left to right: Private James Bezirgianidis, Thomas Harris (ne Hanozoes) and Damainos Daykos. Harris served with the Greek Navy before coming to this country while Deykos saw service with the Army of Greece. Image source: U.S. Army Signal Corps, 1943. World War Two FSA/OWI Photograph Collection.

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New York: Pop Art Blue New York City Night Poster

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Pop Art Blue New York City Night Poster
Pop Art Blue New York City Night Poster by made_in_atlantis
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New York: Broadway and the Road

Visitors in New York must have often made this particular mistake, and occasionally a native, too. Strolling across town in the middle forties between Sixth Avenue and Eighth Avenue in the daylight hours (visitors), or hasten across town on business (natives), they will stop suddenly in front of a large poster on the doors or walls of a theater announcing one of the hits of the season. The visitor in town will see the placard for the first time. The native whose business lies in the neighborhood may have passed that bill fifty times. On this occasion visitor or native stops, looks and decides to go in and buy a couple of seats.

He tries for the nearest door and finds it locked. This does not surprise him because of a familiar practice in all theaters. Out of hours they lock all but one of their many front doors and put in a small sign saying “Please Use Other Door”; which sign the customer usually overlooks, and is much tossed about from pillar to post before he finds an open door near the box office.

This time our potential customer finds all the doors locked. The hour is not too early for box-office trade and he is puzzled. Finally he looks at the poster again, and after some time he has the answer. He finds that he is standing in front of the Saratoga Theater but the smash hit advertised on the poster is running at the Pequot Theater three blocks away. The Saratoga Theater itself is closed twenty-four hours a day; and if the frustrated customer is one who has passed by that way often he may recall that the theater has been closed for months and even for years.

Among the most depressing sights in town are the locked and shuttered theaters, of which there have been so many on the side streets of Broadway ever since the glad mad days of the twenties when we overbuilt everything from eighty-story office buildings and forty-story hotels to palatial high schools and city jails and theaters. A deserted theater is a drearier sight than an abandoned and shuttered tenement house for obvious reasons. It was built for merriment, and tenements are not. The derelict tenement house may any day be torn down and in its place a block of model housing will arisei but no one will tear down a deserted theater to build a new theater.

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Photography: New York City Skyline Art Print

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Vintage Sepia Old Style New York City Skyline Poster
Vintage Sepia Old Style New York City Skyline Poster by made_in_atlantis
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