Tag: Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali and Rose Meditative

Share this artwork:

Salvador Dali and Rose Meditative

Dalí, May 11, 1904, in Spain’s Catalonia region located in the town of Figueres, Salvador Dalí and Felipa Domenech Ferres i Cusí couple’s second child came into the world. The couple’s first child was born in 1901, Dalí’s birth, nine months and ten days ago (August 1, 1903), died of inflammation of the digestive tract, it is a name that Salvador had been the second child.

The first children at a young age to die a kind of acceptance can not Dalí couple of small Dali by frequent dead brother talking about the first Salvador’s a picture of the bedroom walls of the sheds, and Dalí’yle together regularly for the first Salvador’s tomb visits were. This, in Dalí’s early years led to confusion about their identity. Later, I did not know about his brother “were alike as two drops of water, but reflected was different. It was probably my first version was designed to be more positive.” I would write.

Dali’s father, a notary public was tough and authoritarian character. Unlike the full understanding and compassionate mother and son had given support to the efforts of the painting. Dali’s sister Ana María was born three years old. House as the only male child, mother, sister, aunt, grandmother, friends and carers of interest from the permanent Dalí, spoiled and capricious since a young age began to display a character.

1914 with the support of his mother to a special school post pictures of the Dali opened his first exhibition at the Municipal Theater in Figueres in 1919. In February 1921 of his beloved mother died of breast cancer. About his mother’s death “was the biggest blow I received in my life. I used to adore him. There may make my soul will not appear inevitable flaws always accept the loss of a being I could not trust.” I would write. Dali’s father, shortly after the death of his wife’s sister married.

Tags : , , ,

Mirage by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:


Mirage by Salvador Dali

dali posters, Expressionism, Figurative Art, mirage art print, Modern Art, Salvador Dali, salvador dali posters, Spanish Art

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Woman with a Head of Roses by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:


Woman with a Head of Roses by Salvador Dali

salvador dali, salvador dali artworks, salvador dali paintings, woman with a head of roses, salvador dali biography, salvador dali periods

Tags : , , , , ,

Salvador Dali and Religion

Share this artwork:

The Birth of a God by Salvador Dali

Salvador Dalí’s experience of religion was divided from early on. His mother’s family were devout Catholics, but his father was a staunch atheist who sent him initially to the local state school to spare his son a Catholic education. The young Dalí shared his father’s aversion.

In 1929–30 his films Un Chien andalou and L’Age d’or, made with Luis Bunuel, included scandalous portrayals of the priesthood as corrupt, ignorant and hypocritical. In 1929 Dalí also drew a blasphemous image of Christ and the sacred heart, which he entitled Sometimes I spit with pleasure on the portrait of my mother (The Sacred Heart) to the anger and distress of his family.

Although he once blamed Catholicism for his profound sense of guilt about sex, Dalí began drifting back to the church from the 1940s onwards exploring his religious roots and studying medieval, particularly Spanish mystics for whom art, science and religion were one.

During a private audience with Pope Pius X11 in 1949, Dalí showed him his latest painting The Madonna of Port Lligat – the serene canvas depicting his wife Gala as the Virgin Mary floating dreamily above the bay of Port Lligat was blessed by the pontiff.

On 19 October 1950, he gave a lecture at the Ateneu in Barcelona, titled ‘Why I was Sacrilegious. Why I am a Mystic’ which sought to explain his transformation from a zealous anti-cleric to a devout Catholic albeit one who lacked complete ‘faith’. Reincarnating himself,he attempted to persuade his audience that he was himself a true religious mystic who reinterpreted and rationalised the Christian religion through the lens of contemporary scientific discoveries.

The paintings from this period that Dalí called Nuclear mysticism are characterised by a painterly style characteristic of traditions of classicism particularly those of the great Italian masters of ten Renaissance period such as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. During a television interview with American Mike Wallace in 1958 Dalí explained that everything in life was erotic and therefore ugly, whilst death in comparison was free of eroticism and a sublime, beautiful experience. Nevertheless he feared his own death and hoped to avoid it altogether. Failing this he died with last rites in 1989.

Tags : , , , , , ,

Surrealism: The Metamorphosis of Narcissus by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:

Surrealism: The Metamorphosis of Narcissus by Salvador Dali

Metamorphosis of Narcissus (1937) is an oil-on-canvas painting by the Spanish surrealist Salvador Dalí. This painting is from Dalí’s Paranoiac-critical period. According to Greek mythology, Narcissus fell in love with his own reflection in a pool. Unable to embrace the watery image, he pined away, and the gods immortalized him as a flower. Dalí completed this painting in 1937 on his long awaited return to Paris after having had great success in the United States.

The painting shows Narcissus sitting in a pool, gazing down. Not far away there is a decaying stone figure which corresponds closely to him but is perceived quite differently; as a hand holding up a bulb or egg from which a Narcissus is growing. The egg has been used as a symbol for sexuality in other paintings by Dalí. In the background, a group of naked figures can be seen, while a third Narcissus like figure appears on the horizon.

Dalí wrote the following poem, which accompanied the painting when it was initially exhibited:

Under the split in the retreating black cloud
the invisible scale of spring
is oscillating
in the fresh April sky.
On the highest mountain,
the god of the snow,
his dazzling head bent over the dizzy space of reflections,
starts melting with desire
in the vertical cataracts of the thaw
annihilating himself loudly among the excremental cries of minerals,
or
between [sic] the silences of mosses
towards the distant mirror of the lake
in which,
the veils of winter having disappeared,
he has newly discovered
the lightning flash
of his faithful image.
It seems that with the loss of his divinity the whole high plateau
pours itself out,
crashes and crumbles
among the solitude and the incurable silence of iron oxides
while its dead weight
raises the entire swarming and apotheosic
plateau from the plain
from which already thrust towards the sky
the artesian fountains of grass
and from which rise,
erect,
tender,
and hard,
the innumerable floral spears
of the deafening armies of the germination of the narcissi.

Tags : , , , , ,

Apparition of the Face of Aphrodite by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:


Apparition of the Face of Aphrodite by Salvador Dali

apparition of the face of aphrodite, collections, modern masters, popular artists, Salvador Dali, Spanish Art, Surrealism

Tags : , , , , , ,

The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:

The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali

The Persistence of Memory is a 1931 painting by artist Salvador Dalí, and is one of his most recognizable works.

First shown at the Julien Levy Gallery in 1932, since 1934 the painting has been in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, which received it from an anonymous donor. It is widely recognized and frequently referenced in popular culture, and sometimes referred to by more descriptive (though incorrect) titles, such as ‘The Soft Watches’ or ‘The Melting Watches’.

The well-known surrealist piece introduced the image of the soft melting pocket watch. It epitomizes Dalí’s theory of “softness” and “hardness”, which was central to his thinking at the time. As Dawn Ades wrote, “The soft watches are an unconscious symbol of the relativity of space and time, a Surrealist meditation on the collapse of our notions of a fixed cosmic order”. This interpretation suggests that Dalí was incorporating an understanding of the world introduced by Albert Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity. Asked by Ilya Prigogine whether this was in fact the case, Dalí replied that the soft watches were not inspired by the theory of relativity, but by the surrealist perception of a Camembert melting in the sun.

It is possible to recognize a human figure in the middle of the composition, in the strange “monster” that Dalí used in several contemporary pieces to represent himself – the abstract form becoming something of a self-portrait, reappearing frequently in his work. The figure can be read as a “fading” creature, one that often appears in dreams where the dreamer cannot pinpoint the creature’s exact form and composition.

One can observe that the creature has one closed eye with several eyelashes, suggesting that the creature is also in a dream state. The iconography may refer to a dream that Dalí himself had experienced, and the clocks may symbolize the passing of time as one experiences it in sleep or the persistence of time in the eyes of the dreamer.

The orange clock at the bottom left of the painting is covered in ants. Dalí often used ants in his paintings as a symbol of decay. The Persistence of Memory employs “the exactitude of realist painting techniques” to depict imagery more likely to be found in dreams than in waking consciousness.

Tags : , , , , , ,

The Separation of Adam Art Print by Salvador Dali

Share this artwork:

The Separation of Adam Art Print by Salvador Dali

the separation of atom, salvador dali, salvador dali artworks, surrealism, surrealist art, spanish art, fine art posters, figurative art prints, spanish masters, landscape paintings, spanish artists

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Surrealism: Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate

Share this artwork:

Surrealism: Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate

Surrealism is a literary and art movement influenced by Freudianism and dedicated to the expression of imagination as revealed in dreams, free of the conscious control of reason and free of convention. The movement was founded (1924) in Paris by André Breton, with his Manifeste du surréalisme, but its ancestry is traced to the French poets Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, and to the Italian painter, Giorgio de Chirico. Many of its adherents had belonged to the Dada movement. In literature, surrealism was confined almost exclusively to France.

Surrealist writers were interested in the associations and implications of words rather than their literal meanings; their works are thus extraordinarily difficult to read. Among the leading surrealist writers were Louis Aragon, Paul Éluard, Robert Desnos, and Jean Cocteau, the last noted particularly for his surreal films. In art the movement became dominant in the 1920s and 30s and was internationally practiced with many and varied forms of expression.

Salvador Dalí and Yves Tanguy used dreamlike perception of space and dream-inspired symbols such as melting watches and huge metronomes. Max Ernst and René Magritte constructed fantastic imagery from startling combinations of incongruous elements of reality painted with photographic attention to detail.

These artists have been labeled as verists because their paintings involve transformations of the real world. “Absolute” surrealism depends upon images derived from psychic automatism, the subconscious, or spontaneous thought. Works by Joan Miró and André Masson are in this vein. The movement survived but was greatly diminished after World War II.

Tags : , , , , , , ,